Quantcast
Last updated on April 19, 2014 at 1:20 EDT

Latest Lung cancer screening Stories

2008-07-30 15:01:17

A population-based breast cancer screening program in Norway compared physician- and self-referrals in Vermont in detecting cancer, researchers said. Berta Geller of the University of Vermont in Burlington, Solveig Hofvind of the Cancer Registry of Norway and colleagues compared the screening approaches by looking at the percentage of women who were recalled for a re-evaluation, the screening detection rate of breast cancer and the rate of interval cancers in 45,050 women in Vermont and...

2006-07-14 16:42:43

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A blood test that looks for the body's own immune response to tumors may provide an easy way to find lung cancer in patients long before an X-ray or CT scan could, U.S. researchers reported on Friday. The test correctly predicted non-small-cell lung cancer in blood samples taken from patients years before they were actually diagnosed with lung cancer, the researchers reported. If the test's reliability can be confirmed, it might become the first new blood...

2006-03-16 08:28:05

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A test that finds damaged genes in the lungs of people considered at high risk of lung cancer might be able to predict who actually develops the deadly disease, U.S. researchers said on Wednesday. The test is still not accurate enough for widespread use, but could replace risky and expensive X-rays, the researchers said. "Short of repeatedly X-raying a person's lungs to look for emerging tumors, there is no way now to screen people at high risk for lung...

2006-01-10 17:55:32

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - In people at high risk for lung cancer, low-dose CT scanning of the chest may detect early lung cancer, researchers report. However, "its usefulness as a screening tool is limited" because it misses tumors in certain areas of the lung and often falsely identifies harmless spots as being cancerous. The results have been mixed on the ability of CT scans to spot early lung tumors, when cure rates following surgery are excellent, note Dr. R. MacRedmond from...

2005-12-20 16:48:30

By Megan Rauscher NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Screening chest x-ray detects a substantial number of lung cancers at an early potentially curable stage, according to initial findings from the largest US study of the efficacy of screening for lung cancer in men and women. According to the initial chest x-rays of 77,465 people in the screening arm of the trial, 5,991 -- nearly 9 percent -- had results that were deemed "suspicious for lung cancer." Upon further testing, 126 individuals...

2005-10-31 13:26:54

By Martha Kerr MONTREAL (Reuters Health) - Canadian investigators reported here Monday that they have identified DNA changes in cells taken from the inside of the cheek that are associated with a risk for stage I lung cancer. Dr. Bojana Turic said that her team's focus has been on detecting stage I lung cancer because that stage is considered treatable. Most lung cancers are detected at later stages. Turic and her colleagues at Perceptronix, Inc., in Vancouver, Canada, collected...

2005-07-01 15:40:00

Bethesda, Maryland (July 1, 2005) "“ The risk of developing cancer as a result of being exposed to X-rays during computed tomography colonography (also known as "virtual colonoscopy" or CT colonography) is considerably less than 1 percent, according to an article published today in the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) journal Gastroenterology. Researchers say the radiation risk can be further reduced by creating optimized protocols for performing this screening test....

2004-11-30 06:00:10

CHICAGO -- Using computerized scans to screen for lung cancer can help save lives and should be part of a regular checkup for people who have a high risk for the disease, a new study says. Ninety-six percent of the patients in the study diagnosed with lung cancer through CT scans and had the cancer removed found that the disease did not return, said the study's lead investigator, Claudia Henschke, a radiology professor and head of chest imaging at New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill...

2d417a81313ca869cb5131571f1253ce1
2004-11-29 06:00:00

CHICAGO -- Using computerized scans to screen for lung cancer can help save lives and should be part of a regular checkup for people who have a high risk for the disease, a new study says. Ninety-six percent of the patients in the study who were diagnosed with lung cancer through CT scans and had the cancer removed found that the disease did not return, said the study's lead investigator, Claudia Henschke, a radiology professor and head of chest imaging at New York-Presbyterian...