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Last updated on April 18, 2014 at 8:55 EDT

Latest Lymphopoiesis Stories

2014-04-17 15:39:29

Scientists have uncovered a new way the immune system may fight cancers and viral infections. The finding could aid efforts to use immune cells to treat illness. The research, in mice, suggests that some organs have the immunological equivalent of “neighborhood police” – specialized squads of defenders that patrol only one area, a single organ, instead of an entire city, the body. Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have shown that the liver, skin...

2014-03-25 08:30:19

Modified MIC Proteins as Targeted Immunotherapy for Cancer and Virus-Infected Cells SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, Calif., March 25, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- AvidBiotics Corp., a privately held biotechnology company developing novel, non-antibody proteins targeting cancer and virus-infected cells, today announced that it has received an issued patent from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office covering the targetable immunotherapeutic platform being developed by the company. US Patent No....

2014-03-03 15:23:11

UC San Diego scientists explain how and when T cells become effector or memory lymphocytes Using technologies and computational modeling that trace the destiny of single cells, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine describe for the first time the earliest stages of fate determination among white blood cells called T lymphocytes, providing new insights that may help drug developers create more effective, longer-lasting vaccines against microbial pathogens...

2013-11-26 16:24:38

The blood stem cells that live in bone marrow are at the top of a complex family tree. Such stem cells split and divide down various pathways that ultimately produce red cells, white cells and platelets. These “daughter” cells must be produced at a rate of about one million per second to constantly replenish the body’s blood supply. Researchers have long wondered what allows these stem cells to persist for decades, when their progeny last for days, weeks or months before they need to...

2013-11-25 09:50:51

Implications for fighting T-cell leukemias The lab of Avinash Bhandoola, PhD, professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, has studied the origins of T cells for many years. One protein called Notch, which has well-known roles in the development of multiple tissues, plays an essential role in triggering T-cell development. T cells are immune cells that are made in the thymus, a small organ situated under the breastbone near the heart. However, T cells, like all blood-cell types,...

2013-10-27 23:00:55

May Be Able to Recreate Conditions That Keep Cancer Cells from Growing after They Have Spread New York, NY (PRWEB) October 27, 2013 Oncologists have long puzzled over the fact that after cancer treatment, single cancer cells that are dispersed throughout the body – so-called disseminated tumor cells – are quick to grow and form secondary tumors called metastases in certain organs, while in other organs they metastasize more slowly, sometimes decades later. Such is the case with head...

2013-09-23 11:33:51

Melbourne researchers have found that even our immune system is subject to performance enhancement, giving immune cells the boost they need to ensure the best team is selected to fight infections. The discovery could help in developing new treatments for blood diseases such as leukemia and autoimmune diseases in which the body attacks its own tissues, such as diabetes or rheumatoid arthritis. It could also be used to enhance immune response to HIV and other chronic infections. The...

2013-08-15 09:41:09

Researchers at the University of Georgia are developing a new treatment technique that uses nanoparticles to reprogram immune cells so they are able to recognize and attack cancer. The findings were published recently in the early online edition of ACS Nano. The human body operates under a constant state of martial law. Chief among the enforcers charged with maintaining order is the immune system, a complex network that seeks out and destroys the hordes of invading bacteria and viruses...

2013-07-23 14:49:18

Transcription factor EBF1 reminds cells who they are Mature cells develop through a number of immature stages. During this process, they must remember the specialization they are committed to. For immune system B cells, Rudolf Grosschedl of the Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics and his team have discovered that the transcription factor EBF1 is crucial for B cells to remember who they are. When the researchers switched off the transcription factor, the cells lost their...

2013-05-15 11:45:57

Better understanding of cells' development has implications in study of inflammatory diseases Labs around the world, and a core group at Penn, have been studying recently described populations of immune cells called innate lymphoid cells (ILCs). Some researchers liken them to foot soldiers that protect boundary tissues such as the skin, the lining of the lung, and the lining of the gut from microbial onslaught. They also have shown they play a role in inflammatory disease, when the body's...