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Latest Lysosome Stories

2014-04-07 15:48:32

A University of Colorado Cancer Center study recently published in the journal Cell Reports and presented today at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Conference 2014 shows that the cellular process of autophagy in which cells "eat" parts of themselves in times of stress may allow cancer cells to recover and divide rather than die when faced with chemotherapies. Autophagy, from the Greek "to eat oneself," is a process of cellular recycling in which cell organelles...

2013-09-13 08:12:39

Similarities found between HIV-associated brain damage and impairment from genetic fat-storage disease Johns Hopkins scientists have found that levels of certain fats found in cerebral spinal fluid can predict which patients with HIV are more likely to become intellectually impaired. The researchers believe that these fat markers reflect disease-associated changes in how the brain metabolizes these fat molecules. These changes disrupt the brain cells' ability to regulate the activity of...

2013-07-29 16:18:27

A seafood contaminant that thrives in brackish water during the summer works like a spy to infiltrate cells and quickly open communication channels to sicken the host, researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center report. Vibrio parahaemolyticus bacteria, which cause gastroenteritis, inject proteins called effectors into host cells. One of those effectors, VopQ, almost immediately starts to disrupt the important process of autophagy via a novel channel-forming mechanism, the scientists...

2013-06-25 23:31:51

The Life, Earth and Health Sciences Magazine EurekaMag.com provides 36 million references including 11 million summaries in the basic and applied biological, geographical and agricultural sciences. While this content base has now been expanded to include 180,868 newly published references on ultrastructural studies, all content is now available through a newly developed mobile site. Mannheim, Germany (PRWEB) June 25, 2013 The Science Website EurekaMag.com has newly published 181 thousand...

2013-04-26 10:24:16

A protein known to be a key player in the development of Parkinson's disease is able to enter and harm cells in the same way that viruses do, according to a Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine study. The protein is called alpha-synuclein. The study shows how, once inside a neuron, alpha synuclein breaks out of lysosomes, the digestive compartments of the cell. This is similar to how a cold virus enters a cell during infection. The finding eventually could lead to the...

2012-04-02 09:27:32

IFITM3 protein is critical to the structure and function of cellular machinery involved in blocking virus production Scientists from the University of Utah School of Medicine have discovered that a mouse protein called IFITM3 contributes to the body's defense against some types of viral infections by binding to an enzyme responsible for regulating the pH of a cell's waste disposal system. This finding, published in the March 30, 2012, issue of Innate Immunity, sheds light on the cellular...

2012-03-13 10:57:07

A University of Michigan cell biologist and his colleagues have identified a potential drug that speeds up trash removal from the cell's recycling center, the lysosome. The finding suggests a new way to treat rare inherited metabolic disorders such as Niemann-Pick disease and mucolipidosis Type IV, as well as more common neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, said Haoxing Xu, who led a U-M team that reported its findings March 13 in the online, multidisciplinary...

2011-09-12 11:18:25

Earlier this year, an international consortium of researchers showed that a master gene called transcription factor EB or TFEB controls both the mechanism by which debris is gathered up in cell and that which destroys it. In a report in the current issue of the journal Developmental Cell, Dr. Andrea Ballabio, scientific director at the Telethon Institute of Genetics and Medicine in Naples Italy, and a professor of molecular and human genetics at Baylor College of Medicine and the Jan and...

2011-09-01 16:40:08

Just as we must take out the trash to keep our homes clean and safe, it is essential that our cells have mechanisms for dealing with wastes and worn-out proteins. When these processes are not working properly, unwanted debris builds up in the cell and creates a toxic environment. Now, a new study published by Cell Press on September 1st in the journal Developmental Cell describes a master regulator of the intracellular recycling and waste removal process and suggests an alternative strategy...

2011-06-01 07:47:09

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Cells, like ordinary households, produce "garbage" "“ debris and dysfunctional elements "“ that need disposal. When the mechanism for taking out this garbage fails, rare genetic diseases called lysosomal storage disorders (including Tay-Sachs, Batten and Fabry disease) can disable and even kill the children they affect. In adults, such failure leads to neurodegenerative diseases that occur later in life, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. An...


Word of the Day
call-note
  • The call or cry of a bird or other animal to its mate or its young.
'Call-note' is newer than 'bird-call,' which originally referred to 'an instrument for imitating the note of birds' but now also refers to 'the song or cry of a bird.'
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