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Latest LZ 129 Hindenburg Stories

Hindenburg Mystery Solved 76 Years After Deadly Explosion
2013-03-05 12:43:48

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Investigators said they have solved the 76-year-old mystery surrounding the Hindenburg disaster that claimed the lives of 35 of the 100 passengers and crew members on board. According to a team led by British aeronautical engineer Jem Stansfield at the South West Research Institute (SWRI) in San Antonio, Texas, a static electricity-generated spark ignited hydrogen gas leaking from the airship — resulting in the massive explosion...

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2011-08-02 08:20:00

The winning design of a NASA student competition to create a new greener aircraft looks a little like a cross between a plane and a Swiss army knife. More than 20 seniors from the University of Virginia contributed to the winning paper and project they called the VERDe Atrema or Virginia Environmentally Responsible Design (VERDe) Atrema. They responded to a challenge from the Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project of NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate. The challenge was to...

2008-06-25 18:01:17

By Larry Alexander Leave it to the Japanese. Did you see where they've developed a car that does not run on gasoline? That's right. The Honda FCX Clarity runs on hydrogen and electricity, which is cool until one remembers that, back in 1937 at Lakehurst, N.J., it was a mixture of hydrogen and electricity that is believed to have caused the airship Hindenburg to explode. Hydrogen is a volatile sort of gas that frowns on such things as, say, electrical sparks, and reacts in a nasty way....


Word of the Day
siliqua
  • A Roman unit of weight, 1⁄1728 of a pound.
  • A weight of four grains used in weighing gold and precious stones; a carat.
  • In anatomy, a formation suggesting a husk or pod.
  • The lowest unit in the Roman coinage, the twenty-fourth part of a solidus.
  • A coin of base silver of the Gothic and Lombard kings of Italy.
'Siliqua' comes from a Latin word meaning 'a pod.'
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