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Latest Macrophages Stories

2009-04-02 13:50:10

A new study in the April 3rd issue of the journal Cell, a Cell Press publication, helps to explain why people who carry mutations in a gene known as Nurr1 develop a rare, inherited form of Parkinson's disease, the most prevalent movement disorder in people over the age of 65.They have found evidence that the gene normally acts to suppress an inflammatory response and, in turn, the production of neurotoxins in the brain. Those neurotoxins can otherwise spawn the damage to dopaminergic neurons...

2009-04-02 12:31:22

Could provide target for therapy to treat Parkinson's disease, other neuro-degenerative diseasesA research team from the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla has identified a protein in the brain of mice that protects neurons from excessive inflammation, which can lead to neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Their study, which identifies the protective function of a protein called Nurr1 and defines...

2008-01-31 16:55:00

Researchers seek to deny HIV its safe havens in the human body A drug already used to treat parasitic infections, and once looked at for cancer, also attacks the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in a new and powerful way, according to research published today online in the open access journal Retrovirology. Past research has established that HIV has "learned" to hide out in certain human cells where it is safe from the body's counterattack, cells that come to serve as viral reservoirs....

2005-10-11 14:24:11

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- Aging may intensify and prolong feeling run down when common infections like the flu occur, according to researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. A new study, done with mice and published in the Federation of the American Societies of Experimental Biology Journal, suggests that miscommunication between the immune system and brain may be to blame for extended sickness symptoms and other cognitive disorders in elderly people and animals with an...

2005-09-20 15:05:00

PITTSBURGH -- Immune system cells are connected to each other by an extensive network of tiny tunnels that, like a building's hidden pneumatic tube system, are used to shoot signals to distant cells. This surprising discovery, being reported by two University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine researchers in the September issue of the journal Immunity, may explain how an immune response can be so exquisitely swift. The research not only proves cells other than neurons are capable of...

2005-07-12 00:15:00

BETHESDA, Md. (July 12, 2005) "“ Skeletal muscles naturally repair themselves very efficiently after injury. But when they don't, otherwise successful recovery following damage from overuse during exercise, surgery or trauma can be stymied. Furthermore, as we age, muscle repair slows noticeably, and in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and other degenerative muscle diseases, normal repair functions can't cope with disease progression. Researchers from the University of Illinois-Chicago (UIC)...

2005-05-27 22:55:00

Boston, MA - With the unusual opportunity that human leprosy infections provide for study of human immune responses, scientists have discovered how the body's early warning system prompts a rapid immune response by two separate armies of defensive cells. The finding helps explain why, when threatened by microbes like the leprosy bug, this initial defense sometimes succeeds in limiting the damage, but in other cases yields to a dangerous, spreading infection. Led by Stephan R. Krutzik of UCLA,...


Word of the Day
glogg
  • Scandinavian punch made of claret and aquavit with spices and raisins and orange peel and sugar.
This word comes from the Swedish 'glogg,' which is an alteration of 'glodgat,' mulled (wine).
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