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Grazing Red Kangaroos Use Their Tail As An Extra Leg

Grazing Red Kangaroos Use Their Tail As An Extra Leg

Gerard LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online According to a new multi-institutional study of red kangaroos, it has been found that when grazing on all fours, these marsupials use their tail as an extra leg. While grazing, the tail...

Latest Macropods Stories

2014-01-30 08:27:45

BURLINGAME, Calif., Jan. 30, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Blue Kangaroo, the leading Big Data-driven personalized shopping service, announces three significant mobile milestones in the company's history: -- Surpassing 1 million activated mobile users; -- Reaching 100 million mobile shopping events per month; and -- Exceeding 1 billion total shopping events processed since its mobile launch one year ago. (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20140130/PH55928LOGO )...

Kangaroo Poo DNA Test Aids In Conservation Efforts
2013-06-07 07:31:05

April Flowers for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online A simple and cost effective DNA test has been developed by researchers at the University of Adelaide's Australian Centre for Ancient DNA (ACAD) and Environment Institute to identify kangaroo species from their droppings. This will boost the ability to manage and conserve kangaroo populations. DNA extracted from hundreds of droppings collected across north-eastern Australia was used to develop the test, according to a paper...

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2011-08-21 14:54:24

While sequencing the DNA of a member of the kangaroo family for the first time, an international team of researchers believe they have identified the gene responsible for the creature's hop, Judith Burns of BBC News reported on Friday. The project, which is detailed in the latest issue of the journal Genome Biology, centers around the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii), a smaller species of kangaroo located on islands off the south and west coasts of Australia. According to Burns, this...

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2011-07-07 09:30:16

Mother kangaroos face higher health risks to carry and raise their young than their non-reproducing sisters; a new University of Melbourne study has shown. The study, led by Dr Graeme Coulson and Professor Mark Elgar from the Department of Zoology, University of Melbourne demonstrated for the first time that mother Eastern Grey Kangaroos almost double their food intake and significantly reduce their time spent resting in order to meet the nutritional needs of their baby. "By increasing their...

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2011-07-05 14:20:45

Carbon dioxide may be the most name-dropped greenhouse gas, but methane is 20 times more potent. In 2009, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency calculated that 20 percent of the nation's human-related methane emissions were attributable to livestock digestive processes. In Australia, livestock emissions account for 12 percent of the country's total greenhouse gas emissions. To understand how methane is produced in livestock, an international team of scientists including researchers at...

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2010-12-10 10:25:48

Contrary to the recently established theory that marsupials have excellent color vision, research has shown that the wallaby is a rare exception. The research team, led by Dr Jan Hemmi from the ARC Centre of Excellence in Vision Science and The Australian National University, has shown that Tammar wallabies are much weaker in discriminating different colors because they are missing one type of visual pigment cell. "Dr Ebeling has demonstrated that wallabies do not have the complete set of...

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2010-04-13 09:31:11

Australian Aborigines Tuesday declared a large area of land -- 2,240 square miles -- a conservation site to help protect the endangered black-footed rock wallaby. The area, known as the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara, would be managed by its traditional owners for conservation, said the leaders of the region. Environment Minister Peter Garrett said the wallaby, or "warru", would be well protected. "The ranges in the north provide a safe haven for one of the few remaining colonies of...


Latest Macropods Reference Libraries

Black Striped Wallaby, Macropus dorsalis
2013-09-05 11:20:19

The black-striped wallaby (Macropus dorsalis), or the scrub wallaby, is a marsupial that can be found in Australia. Its range extends from New South Wales, where it can be found west of the Great Dividing Range, to Townsville. It prefers a habitat within areas with thick shrub coverage, grasslands, or forested areas. The black-striped wallaby is similar in appearance to the red-necked wallaby, but it is redder in color and bears a white stripe on its hips. This species also bears a black...

Agile Wallaby, Macropus agilis
2013-09-05 11:16:25

The agile wallaby (Macropus agilis), or the sandy wallaby, is a marsupial that can be found in New Guinea and northern Australia. It is the most common wallaby species in its Australian range, where it prefers to reside near streams or rivers in open grasslands, woodlands, and coastal areas. In New Guinea, it prefers to reside in lowland savannah habitats. It holds four recognized subspecies. The agile wallaby is light tan in color, with pale fur occurring on the underbelly. It is a social...

Eastern Hare Wallaby, Lagorchestes leporides
2013-09-02 10:14:59

The eastern hare-wallaby (Lagorchestes leporides), historically named the common hare-wallaby, is an extinct marsupial that was once found in southeastern Australia. Its range included Victoria, New South Wales, and the area near the Murray Region in South Australia. It preferred to live in open areas like grassy plains. John Gould discovered this species in 1844, along with many other wallabies. The eastern hare-wallaby reached an average body length of 1.6 feet, with a tail length of up...

Rufous Hare Wallaby, Lagorchestes hirsutus
2013-09-02 10:08:22

The rufous hare-wallaby (Lagorchestes hirsutus), or the mala, is a marsupial that can be found in Australia. Its range is now limited to western areas of Australia and the islands of Dorre and Bernier, although it once extended to the western part of the continent. John Gould first described it in 1844 in The Mammals of Australia. Its fur is reddish gray in color and it is the smallest species within its genus. It is most active at night and feeds on seeds, leaves, and herbs. The rufous...

Tammar Wallaby, Macropus eugenii
2013-08-21 14:39:46

The tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii), also known as the darma wallaby or dama wallaby, is a marsupial that can be found in western and southern areas of Australia. It has also been introduced into areas of Australia where it once lived and into New Zealand. It prefers a habitat within grassland areas. The tammar wallaby was first discovered in 1817 by a French naturalist named Anselme Gaëtan Desmarest. He found the wallaby on Ile Eugene, an island off the coast of Southern Australia, and...

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Word of the Day
mundungus
  • A stinking tobacco.
  • Offal; waste animal product; organic matter unfit for consumption.
This word comes from the Spanish 'mondongo,' tripe, entrails.