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Latest Madagascar Stories

Closest Relatives To Eyeless Australian Fish Are In Madagascar
2012-08-29 14:13:26

Researchers are first to show ancient trans-oceanic relationship for vertebrate cave animals A team of researchers from Louisiana State University and the American Museum of Natural History has discovered that two groups of blind cave fishes on opposite sides of the Indian Ocean are each other's closest relatives. Through comprehensive DNA analysis, the researchers determined that these eyeless fishes, one group from Madagascar and the other from similar subterranean habitats in Australia,...

Can Biodiversity Be Saved By Nature Parks?
2012-08-07 16:10:47

The 14 years of wildlife studies in and around Madagascar's Ranomafana National Park by Sarah Karpanty, associate professor of wildlife conservation at Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment, and her students are summarily part of a paper on biodiversity published July 25 by Nature's Advanced Online Publication and coming out soon in print. As human activities put increasing pressures on natural systems and wildlife to survive, 200 scientists around the world carved...

Herbal Remedies Found To Be Cost Effective
2012-07-31 15:00:48

Connie K. Ho for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Coughs and sore throats, sickness can be a hassle to deal with. While some people go straight to the pharmacy, others look to their garden or the forest to procure natural ingredients. A Harvard researcher focused on studying natural medicines revealed the economic benefits patients had from using the traditional medicines. Investigator Christopher Golden discovered that patients in northwest Madagascar receive $5 to $8 in...

Past Influences On Biodiversity In Madagascar
2012-07-25 10:35:30

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online While human activity is usually identified as the primary threat to biodiversity through the loss of species, a new study published in the journal Proceedings of the Natural Academy of Sciences (PNAS) focused on identifying pre-human causes of pressures that threaten endangered species. The latest research focused on Madagascar, which is world-renowned for its biodiversity and has been plagued by deforestation and the destruction of...

Madagascar Lemurs Threatened With Extinction
2012-07-13 09:14:08

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online More than a hundred species of lemur are found on Madagascar, a small island in the Indian Ocean just southeast of the African mainland, and a new study suggests that many of these social primates are on their way out. According to the conservation group International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN), as many as 90 percent of the 103 species of lemur found on Madagascar should be listed on the Red List of Threatened...


Latest Madagascar Reference Libraries

Western Woolly Lemur, Avahi occidentalis
2014-04-17 10:05:39

The Western Woolly Lemur or Western Avahi (Avahi occidentalis) is a species of woolly lemur that is native to western Madagascar, where they live in dry deciduous forests. These nocturnal animals weigh about .7 to .9 kilograms. This species is folivorous. This species resides in monogamous pairs together with their offspring. The Western Woolly Lemur mostly consumes leaves and buds that derive from around 20 different plants which haven’t matured and have high levels of sugars and...

800px-Madagascar_Pochard,_Captive_Breeding_Program,_Madagascar_4
2013-04-23 13:18:30

The Madagascar Pochard (Aythya innotata) is an exceptionally rare diving duck belonging to the genus Aythya. Thought to be extinct in the late 1990s, specimens of this species were rediscovered at Lake Matsaborimena in Madagascar in 2006. Only 60 individuals remain after 18 ducklings hatched in a captive breeding center in April 2012. Based on the accounts written by Webb and Delacour’s in the 1920s and 1930s, it seemed that the bird was still relatively common at Lake Alaotra. The duck...

Greater Dwarf Lemur, Cheirogaleus major
2012-09-03 07:04:56

The greater dwarf lemur (Cheirogaleus major), also known as Geoffroy's dwarf lemur, is native only to the island of Madagascar. This species can be found in northern and eastern regions of the island, preferring a habitat within primary and secondary forests, or arid scrub areas. It is a nocturnal species that rests and sleeps in nests made of twigs, leaves, and grasses or in trees with hollow areas. It was thought that a color variation of the greater dwarf lemur, the greater iron-gray dwarf...

Sahamalaza Sportive Lemur, Lepilemur sahamalazensis
2012-08-08 09:26:25

The Sahamalaza sportive lemur (Lepilemur sahamalazensis) is native to the island of Madagascar, where its range is limited to the Sahamalaza Peninsula found in northwestern Madagascar. Because this area is a converging point for two types of habitats, including arid deciduous forests, this lemur resides in both primary and secondary forests. The Sahamalaza sportive lemur is a newly discovered species, along with 14 other members in the Lepilemur genus. Because of this, its taxonomic status...

Crowned Sifaka, Propithecus coronatus
2012-08-08 08:43:18

The crowned sifaka (Propithecus coronatus) is native to Madagascar, with a range that extends to the Mahavavy River in the southwest. The northeastern border of this range is the Betsiboka River. It has been reported that the crowned sifaka occurs in south and southeast Madagascar, which may broaden its range. It prefers to reside in arid deciduous forests in western Madagascar. The crowned sifaka can reach an average body length of 3.3 feet, with a tail length between 1.5 and 1.8 feet....

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Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
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