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Latest Magma Stories

Scientists Look At Supervolcano Life Cycle In Whole New Way
2013-10-11 14:49:13

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Scientists say they've discovered a new way to look at the life cycle of a supervolcano at a Yellowstone hotspot. University of Oregon researchers said that crystals of zircon from the Snake River Plain helped to solidify evidence of "recycled" super-volcanic magma chambers. This Yellowstone hotspot creates a conveyor belt style of volcanism because of the southwest migration of the North American plate at about 0.8 to 1.6 inches...

New Evidence Gives New Life To ‘Percolation’ Theory For Earth’s Core
2013-10-08 17:23:32

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com – Your Universe Online Scientists writing in the journal Nature Geoscience say that a similar process to that which allows water to yank oils from ground coffee  in order to make a cup of joe in the morning, could be how the Earth's core formed. Stanford University scientists recreated the intense pressures and temperatures inside Earth and found that an iron melt network may have helped grow the Earth's core. The finding revisits a theory first proposed...

2013-10-02 23:01:20

Company to Give a “People’s Choice Award” for Best Short Film in the “Mind Games” Category During the Festival Based on Online Voting San Diego, CA (PRWEB) October 02, 2013 Magma, a developer of computer expansion products for servers, desktops and portable platforms, announced its participation as a sponsor for the San Diego Film Festival as a part of the companies outreach program to show the potential of expansion computing solutions for creative professionals. A first time...

2013-09-30 23:37:07

Magma executives herald the coming of a new product line designed especially to offer more computing power and capacity for the demanding creative markets. San Diego, CA (PRWEB) September 30, 2013 Tim Miller, president of Magma, a developer of computer expansion products for servers, desktops and portable platforms, announced today the company’s enhanced focus on providing products to the world’s creative professionals. The announcement heralds the coming of a new line of products...

2013-09-12 23:24:10

Former president, Randy Jones, to remain as chief executive officer San Diego, CA (PRWEB) September 12, 2013 Magma, a developer of high performance expansion products and an industry leader in PCI & PCI Express (PCIe) expansion solutions for servers, desktops and portable platforms, has named Tim Miller as its new company president. Miller, an industry veteran, with over 25-years of experience in the technology sector will oversee the company’s day-to-day operations with a focus on...

2013-09-05 23:23:51

Magma provides a seamless solution for using AJA KONA cards with Thunderbolt-equipped computers. San Diego, CA (PRWEB) September 05, 2013 Magma today announced compatibility of its lineup of PCIe Thunderbolt™ expansion solutions with AJA Video Systems’ leading KONA family of professional video I/O products. The integrated effort allows creative professionals to access expanded computer performance by combining Magma’s ExpressBox 1T or 3T expansion chassis with the enhanced video...

Eruptions Not Always Imminent From Slow Magma
2013-08-20 04:41:19

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new modeling study from the University of Washington reveals reservoirs of silica-rich magma of the sort that causes the most explosive volcanic eruptions can persist for hundreds of thousands of years in the Earth’s upper crust without triggering an eruption. In other words, regions such as Yellowstone National Park, known to have experienced a massive volcanic eruption in the past, could have a large pool of magma festering...

Improved Eruption Forecasts May Come Via Costa Rican Volcano Study
2013-08-01 07:54:55

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Compared to the geologic timescales most volcanoes operate on, Costa Rica's Irazu has something of a short fuse. A new study, led by Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, suggests the 1960's eruption of Costa Rica's largest stratovolcano was triggered by magma rising from the mantle over a few short months, rather than thousands of years or more, as many scientists have thought. The study, published in Nature, is...

Earth's Origins May Be Explained Through Mantle's 'Hidden Flux'
2013-07-17 14:46:32

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online One of the more popular theories surrounding the formation of the planets involves the countless collisions of smaller objects in orbit around the sun 4.5 billion years ago. However, proponents of that theory are missing one thing: the Earth's chemical composition is distinctly different from the meteors that are currently striking the planet. Scientists have found that the lead-uranium ratio of meteors is much different than that of...

Scientists Uncover Link Between Lavas Erupting On Sea Floor And Deep-carbon Cycle
2013-05-03 08:05:27

Smithsonian Scientists from the Smithsonian and the University of Rhode Island have found unsuspected linkages between the oxidation state of iron in volcanic rocks and variations in the chemistry of the deep Earth. Not only do the trends run counter to predictions from recent decades of study, they belie a role for carbon circulating in the deep Earth. The team's research was published May 2 in Science Express. Elizabeth Cottrell, lead author and research geologist at the Smithsonian's...


Latest Magma Reference Libraries

28_b46b9ec00de524c00702bbc1d05bc0c9
2005-05-25 18:34:42

Scoria is a term used by geologists to describe an igneous rock containing many gas bubbles, or vesicules. Scoria forms when magma rich in dissolved gases is vented. As the magma encounters lower pressures, the gasses are able to escape and form bubbles. These bubbles are trapped when the magma cools and solidifies. Volcanic cones of scoria can be left behind after eruptions, usually forming mountains with a crater at the summit. An example is Mount Wellington, Auckland in New Zealand....

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Word of the Day
siliqua
  • A Roman unit of weight, 1⁄1728 of a pound.
  • A weight of four grains used in weighing gold and precious stones; a carat.
  • In anatomy, a formation suggesting a husk or pod.
  • The lowest unit in the Roman coinage, the twenty-fourth part of a solidus.
  • A coin of base silver of the Gothic and Lombard kings of Italy.
'Siliqua' comes from a Latin word meaning 'a pod.'
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