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Latest Magma Stories

Earth's Origins May Be Explained Through Mantle's 'Hidden Flux'
2013-07-17 14:46:32

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online One of the more popular theories surrounding the formation of the planets involves the countless collisions of smaller objects in orbit around the sun 4.5 billion years ago. However, proponents of that theory are missing one thing: the Earth's chemical composition is distinctly different from the meteors that are currently striking the planet. Scientists have found that the lead-uranium ratio of meteors is much different than that of...

Scientists Uncover Link Between Lavas Erupting On Sea Floor And Deep-carbon Cycle
2013-05-03 08:05:27

Smithsonian Scientists from the Smithsonian and the University of Rhode Island have found unsuspected linkages between the oxidation state of iron in volcanic rocks and variations in the chemistry of the deep Earth. Not only do the trends run counter to predictions from recent decades of study, they belie a role for carbon circulating in the deep Earth. The team's research was published May 2 in Science Express. Elizabeth Cottrell, lead author and research geologist at the Smithsonian's...

Magma May Be Natural Lubricant For Moving Tectonic Plates
2013-03-21 11:09:11

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Scientists from the University of California, San Diego´s (UCSD) Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) have discovered a liquefied layer of molten rock in the planet´s mantle — a substance which could be acting as a lubricant of the sliding motions of the Earth´s tectonic plates. The magma layer was discovered at the Middle America trench offshore Nicaragua during a 2010 expedition aboard the US Navy-owned...

Seas Of Molten Rock Created By Lunar Impacts
2013-03-12 04:54:36

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online An ocean of molten rock covered the entire lunar surface during the early part of the Moon's history. Over millions of years, that magma ocean cooled, differentiating to form the crust and mantle. According to new analysis of NASA's Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) data, led by Brown University planetary scientists, this wasn't the last time the Moon's surface melted on such a massive scale. Graduate student William Vaughan led...

Mercury May Have Hosted A Magma Ocean In Its Past
2013-02-21 13:29:25

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Scientists analyzing data from NASA's MESSENGER spacecraft say that Mercury once harbored an ancient magma ocean. An MIT team of scientists say that Mercury may have had a large ocean of magma very early in its history, shortly after its formation about 4.5 billion years ago. A group of scientists analyzed X-ray fluorescence data from MESSENGER collected back in 2011. They were able to identify two distinct compositions of rocks on...

Subduction Evidence From Billions Of Years Ago
2013-01-19 06:32:40

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Researchers for the first time have discovered evidence supporting the theory that the processes that act as catalysts for volcanic activity today are similar to those that occurred nearly four billion years ago. Writing in the journal Geology, Frances Jenner of the Carnegie Institution for Science and colleagues report that 3.8 billion-year-old volcanic rocks recovered from an island in southwestern Greenland support previous...

Earth’s Magma Mantle Melts Hotter Than Previously Thought
2013-01-10 10:10:41

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online According to a new study by researchers at Rice University, the Earth's mantle magma melts far hotter and deeper in the Earth's core than previously thought, a discovery that will have lasting implications for our understanding of the planet's geophysical and geochemical properties. The research team, led by Rajdeep Dasgupta, put small amounts of peridotite under large pressures in a laboratory to determine that rock can and does...

Breaking Through The Crust: Unraveling The Magma Mystery
2012-11-30 13:54:20

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Even though two-thirds of the Earth's solid surface is covered with oceanic crust, scientists still do not entirely understood the process by which it is made. But a recent study from the Carnegie Institution for Science, which analyzed more than 600 samples of oceanic crust, reveals a systemic pattern that alters long-held beliefs about how the process works. Findings of this study, published in the journal Nature, explain a...

Volcanic Eruptions Driven By Bubble Growth
2012-10-17 04:36:06

Alan McStravick for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online From Pompeii to Mount St. Helens, we humans have watched in awe, and sometimes horror, the magnificence of volcanic eruptions. As detailed in a great article earlier this month by redOrbit´s own Lee Rannals, monogenetic volcanoes, volcanoes erupting due to the combination of water and magma, are driven by a rapid expansion of gas bubbles that form as the water, previously trapped in molten rock, rises beneath the volcano....

Trigger For Explosive Volcanic Eruptions Identified
2012-10-13 09:27:11

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Scientists have identified a trigger for the largest explosive volcanic eruptions on Earth, according to a report published in the journal Scientific Reports. University of Southampton researchers investigated crystal cumulate nodules and their trapped magma to see what caused eruptions at the Las Cañadas volcanic caldera on Tenerife, in the Canary Islands. This volcano has generated at least eight major...


Latest Magma Reference Libraries

28_b46b9ec00de524c00702bbc1d05bc0c9
2005-05-25 18:34:42

Scoria is a term used by geologists to describe an igneous rock containing many gas bubbles, or vesicules. Scoria forms when magma rich in dissolved gases is vented. As the magma encounters lower pressures, the gasses are able to escape and form bubbles. These bubbles are trapped when the magma cools and solidifies. Volcanic cones of scoria can be left behind after eruptions, usually forming mountains with a crater at the summit. An example is Mount Wellington, Auckland in New Zealand....

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Word of the Day
cruet
  • A vial or small glass bottle, especially one for holding vinegar, oil, etc.; a caster for liquids.
This word is Middle English in origin, and ultimately comes from the Old French, diminutive of 'crue,' flask.
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