Quantcast

Latest Magnetoception Stories

2014-06-04 15:19:56

Oregon State University Exposure to iron pipes and steel rebar, such as the materials found in most hatcheries, affects the navigation ability of young steelhead trout by altering the important magnetic "map sense" they need for migration, according to new research from Oregon State University. The exposure to iron and steel distorts the magnetic field around the fish, affecting their ability to navigate, said Nathan Putman, who led the study while working as a postdoctoral researcher...

Dogs Poop According To The Earth's Magnetic Field
2014-01-03 04:44:08

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Ever wonder why your dog turns in circles before relieving himself? A new study published Friday in the journal Frontiers in Zoology may hold the answer. The researchers discovered that dogs of a variety of breeds align their bodies with the Earth’s magnetic field before squatting, and even the smallest fluctuations in the magnetic field will affect the dogs’ position. The researchers at Czech University of Life Sciences...

2012-07-10 14:53:07

Migratory birds and fish use the Earth´s magnetic field to find their way. LMU researchers have now identified cells with internal compass needles for the perception of the field — and can explain why high-tension cables perturb the magnetic orientation. Although many animal species can sense the geomagnetic field and exploit it for spatial orientation, efforts to pinpoint the cells that detect the field and convert the information into nerve impulses have so far failed....

Earth’s Magnetic Field Gives Pigeons Built-in GPS
2012-04-27 04:53:47

Certain neurons in the brains of pigeons encode the direction and intensity of the Earth´s magnetic field, giving the birds an inborn internal global positioning system, according to a new study published Thursday in the journal Science. Scientists have long known internal magnetic field receptors exist in many animals, perhaps including humans.  However, the current study is the first to actually describe the brain wiring that uses these receptors to provide a sense of...

7164e37b383f2a2342eb5099068c8553
2011-06-22 06:05:00

Research published this week in the journal Nature Communications shows that a light-sensitive protein found in the human eye can act as a "compass" in the magnetic field when implanted into the eyes of Drosophila (flies). The study showed that without their natural "magneto reception" protein, flies do not respond to a magnetic field. But after replacing the protein with a human version of the protein, their ability was restored. For migratory birds and some other animals, the ability to...

d07322f5392e2aeb9445fc0721b103d41
2011-02-25 09:18:02

From the very first moments of life, hatchling loggerhead sea turtles have an arduous task. They must embark on a transoceanic migration, swimming from the Florida coast eastward to the North Atlantic and then gradually migrating over the course of several years before returning again to North American shores. Now, researchers reporting online on February 24 in Current Biology, a Cell Press publication, have figured out how the young turtles find their way. "One of the great mysteries of...

2010-02-23 14:38:21

Iron containing short nerve branches in the upper beak of birds may serve as a magnetometer to measure the vector of the Earth magnetic field (intensity and inclination) and not only as a magnetic compass, which shows the direction of the magnetic field lines. Already several years ago, the Frankfurt neurobiologists Dr.Gerta Fleissner and her husband Prof. Dr. Gnther Fleissner have discovered these structures in homing pigeons and have, in close cooperation with the experimental physicist...

9c59894415606d94998215f6de0eae3f1
2010-01-25 10:22:04

UMass Medical School neurobiologists use transgenic fruit flies and monarch butterfly transgenes to help define magnetoreception mechanism Building on prior investigation into the biological mechanisms through which monarch butterflies are able to migrate up to 2,000 miles from eastern North America to a particular forest in Mexico each year, neurobiologists at the University of Massachusetts Medical School (UMMS) have linked two related photoreceptor proteins found in butterflies to animal...

b0e17388027fa0d6f22a2ae70ce32e011
2009-06-22 11:00:00

 Researchers at the University of Illinois report that a toxic molecule known to damage cells and cause disease may also play a pivotal role in bird migration. The molecule, superoxide, is proposed as a key player in the mysterious process that allows birds to "see" Earth's magnetic field.The discovery, reported this month in Biophysical Journal, occurred as a result of a "mistake" made by a collaborator, said principal investigator Klaus Schulten, who holds the Swanlund Chair in Physics...

982504787fab3939fb240b1edcdfc2ba1
2008-08-26 06:40:00

No bull, scientists say they have discovered cows have a sense of direction. Researchers studied satellite photos of thousands of cows around the world, and they seem to have a built-in compass that leads to north and south. A team of German and Czech researchers published their reports in Tuesday's issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.Regardless of what continent the cattle were grazing on, their sense of direction held fast, according to the study led by Hynek Burda and...


Word of the Day
tessitura
  • The prevailing range of a vocal or instrumental part, within which most of the tones lie.
This word is Italian in origin and comes from the Latin 'textura,' web, structure.