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Latest Malurus Stories

Active Nightlife Of Birds Driven By Desire To Reproduce
2014-01-23 10:04:09

For a non-nocturnal bird, the yellow-breasted chat spends a significant amount of time visiting other birds' territories during the night.

New Study Shows Low-pitched Song Of The Fairy-wren Indicates Size
2013-02-21 09:36:09

The study led by University of Melbourne researcher Dr Michelle Hall, is the first to show that the larger the male fairy wren, the lower the pitch of his song.

Password For Food Needed By Fairy-wren Babies
2012-11-08 16:53:14

It's always a good idea to listen to your mother, but that goes double for baby fairy-wrens even before they are hatched.

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2011-03-21 07:13:47

A puzzling example of altruism in nature has been debunked with researchers showing that purple-crowned fairy wrens are in reality cunningly planning for their own future when they assist in raising other birds’ young by balancing the amount of assistance they give with the benefits they expect to receive in the future.

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2011-01-18 11:38:06

Male splendid fairy-wrens hitchhike onto predator calls to capture female attention.


Latest Malurus Reference Libraries

White-winged Fairy-wren, Malurus leucopterus
2009-07-17 11:00:21

The White-winged Fairy-wren (Malurus leucopterus) is a unique species of passerine bird in the Maluridae family. This bird can be found from the middle of Queensland and South Australia to the other side of Western Australia. Similar to other fairy-wrens, males express a strong intensity of sexual dimorphism and feathers change to shining colors during breeding season. The female is the smaller of the two and has a sandy-brown body with soft-blue tail feathers. The male's feathers change...

Supurb Fairywren, Malurus cyaneus
2009-07-17 10:52:12

The Superb Fairy-wren (Malurus cyaneus), is an ordinary passerine bird of the fairy-wren family Maluridae. This bird is also known as the Superb Blue-wren or informally as Blue wren. It can be found throughout southeastern Australia, and is territorial and not migratory. This particular species presents a great level of sexual dimorphism. The breeding feathers of the male are a vibrant blue on the forehead, ear conceals, tail and mantle, with black covering the face. The throat is sometimes...

Red-winged Fairy-wren, Malurus elegans
2009-07-17 10:44:51

The Red-winged Fairy-wren (Malurus elegans) is a passerine bird in the fairy-wren family Maluridae. The southwestern edge of Western Australia is the native land to this lazy bird. The males of this species express a strong intensity of sexual dimorphism; their feathers change to a beautiful pattern of breeding colors. The black upper back and throat contrasts the red shoulders with a silvery-blue head, pale lower side and grey-brown wings and tail. This coloration greatly differs from the...

Red-backed Fairy-wren, Malurus melanocephalus
2009-07-17 10:36:51

The Red-backed Fairy-wren (Malurus melanocephalus) is a passerine bird in the Maluridae family. It is found only in Australia along the coasts of rivers. These rivers are the Hunter Valley in New South Wales and the Kimberley which is the northern portion of Western Australia. This species is similar to other fairy-wrens which show apparent sexual dimorphism. During its breeding time, the feathers turn a vibrant red on the back to contrast with its brown wings, and black tail, underside...

Splendid Fairy-wren, Malurus splendens
2009-07-07 16:25:36

The Splendid Fairy-wren (Malurus splendens) is also called the Splendid Wren or Blue Wren and is one of the 12 species from the genus Malurus, commonly known as fairy-wrens. These birds are small at 5.5 inches in length. The tail of the adult male Splendid Fairy-wren is a striking bright blue with black markings and is a somewhat long. Females and the young birds are brown mixed with some gray colorings. This bird resides in dry and semi-dry regions of Australia and also the forested...

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Word of the Day
whirret
  • To give a box on the ear to.
The word 'whirret' may be onomatopoeic.