Quantcast

Latest Mammal Stories

954c85f868dfc2b91d84a99e195e0d9b1
2010-10-19 06:15:00

New research by scientists at the University of Cambridge in England gives insight into how sloths, one of the few mammals with more than seven neck vertebrae, evolved their uniquely long necks. The mystery of how the three-toed sloth came to have as many as 10 neck vertebrae has long puzzled scientists, given that most of the 5,000 mammal species have exactly seven vertebrae in their necks. Other animals, such as birds and lizards, vary greatly in the number of vertebrae in their...

1ae8341adb5095b7d9f61a695c61ff0f1
2010-10-18 08:15:04

It turns out that the undisputed king of the dinosaurs, Tyrannosaurus rex, didn't just eat other dinosaurs but also each other. Paleontologists from the United States and Canada have found bite marks on the giants' bones that were made by other T. rex, according to a new study published online Oct. 15 in the journal PLoS ONE. While searching through dinosaur fossil collections for another study on dinosaur bones with mammal tooth marks, Yale researcher Nick Longrich discovered a bone with...

efc76b80fe9746ebd1837ce90e425e52
2010-10-12 23:26:30

University of Florida researchers presenting new fossil evidence of an exceptionally well-preserved 55-million-year-old North American mammal have found it shares a common ancestor with rodents and primates, including humans.The study, scheduled to appear in the Oct. 11 online edition of the Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, describes the cranial anatomy of the extinct mammal, Labidolemur kayi. High resolution CT scans of the specimens allowed researchers to study minute details in...

4117e5fb7f755f538f1289e6cac12c9f1
2010-08-25 08:55:54

A new University of Florida study indicates extinct carnivorous mammals shrank in size during a global warming event that occurred 55 million years ago. The study, scheduled to appear in the December print edition of the Journal of Mammalian Evolution and now available online, describes a new species that evolved to half the size of its ancestors during this period of global warming. The hyena-like animal, Palaeonictis wingi, evolved from the size of a bear to the size of a coyote during a...

de7a5e517d0adc1851bffb3374aa4aa31
2010-08-24 09:30:00

The amount of available living space--not competition, as Darwin believed--may have been the catalyst of evolution, according to a new study published in the August 23 edition of Biology Letters. As part of the study, researchers at the University of Bristol analyzed the fossils of birds, mammals, reptiles, and amphibians dating as far back as 400 million years ago. According to BBC News science reporter Howard Falcon-Lang, "the scientists showed that the amount of biodiversity closely...

2010-07-30 16:10:33

Discovery of an evolutionary trait from our earliest ancestors could provide insight into the early development of human embryos Using the model organism Ciona intestinalis, commonly known as the sea squirt, researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, have uncovered the origins of the second heart field in vertebrates. Sea squirts are bag-like gelatinous creatures whose full genome has been sequenced--one that shares 80 percent of its genes with humans. Though its body is clearly...

0fa040eb5e22906cec2e80cb7e6d11ee
2010-07-16 08:57:02

Mammals with larger brains in relation to body size tend to live longer. This is the conclusion reached by researchers at the Centre for Ecological Research and Forestry Applications (CREAF), affiliated to Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, after having analyzed almost 500 mammal species and obtaining new data on the relation between brain size and lifespan. The brain size of some mammals is larger than expected for their body size. This is the case of large primates, such...

83910a7f639f9206514109666087ebd1
2010-07-01 05:39:34

Changes in the marine ecosystem are effecting reproduction in harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) causing them to give birth to their pups much earlier than usual, according to a recent study. The study found that the mammals are birthing their pups 25 days earlier compared to 35 years ago. Scientists believe that removal of large fish species by the fishing industry was allowing populations of smaller species to thrive. These smaller species are favored by the seals. "We report on a continual...

2010-06-25 15:33:37

In a novel mathematical model that reproduces sleep patterns for multiple species, an international team of researchers has demonstrated that the neural circuitry that controls the sleep/wake cycle in humans may also control the sleep patterns of 17 different mammalian species. These findings, reported by researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH), the University of Sydney, and the Center for Integrated Research and Understanding of Sleep (Camperdown, Australia), suggest that...

67cd61a553dff743ac73a6f78f26c5651
2010-06-17 07:31:28

Paleontologists have discovered the oldest mammalian tooth marks yet on the bones of ancient animals, including several large dinosaurs. They report their findings in a paper published online June 16 in the journal Paleontology. Nicholas Longrich of Yale University and Michael J. Ryan of the Cleveland Museum of Natural History came across several of the bones while studying the collections of the University of Alberta Laboratory for Vertebrate Palaeontology and the Royal Tyrrell Museum of...


Latest Mammal Reference Libraries

Echidna, Tachyglossidae
2014-06-19 07:53:10

Tachyglossidae is a family that holds eight species of echidnas, also known as spiny anteaters, four of which are known only from fossils. The remaining four species, which include the platypus, can only be found in New Guinea and Australia. They prefer to reside in wooded areas and can be found under piles of vegetation, roots, and occasionally inside the burrows of other animals. This family is named after the "Mother of All Monsters" in Greek mythology, although the two do not resemble...

42_e96da6f440fbe9416f53bf5be8b5f8e3
2007-06-25 07:54:33

The Aardvark, Orycteropus afer, sometimes called the "˜antbear', is a medium-sized mammal native to Africa. It lives south of the Sahara desert where there is suitable habitat for them to live. It prefers savannas, grasslands, woodlands and bush. They are not found in deserts but are found in areas where there is a good supply of ants and termites. The most distinctive characteristic of the Aardvark is their teeth. Instead of having a pulp cavity, they have a number of thin tubes of...

42_767deb25d6255da2c5d97b07d1e38516
2007-01-19 11:46:11

The European Mole, Talpa europaea, is a mammal of the order Soricomorpha. This mole lives in an underground tunnel system, which it constantly extends. It uses these tunnels to hunt its prey. Under normal conditions the displaced earth is pushed to the surface, resulting in the characteristic "mole hills". It has a cylindrical body and is around 5 1/4 inches (12 cm) long. Females are typically smaller than males. The eyes are small, and hidden behind fur. Its ear is just a small ridge...

42_f294be1ec1fa65e8319af46dc77bf24b
2006-12-12 11:27:08

The platypus is a semi-aquatic endemic to eastern Australia and Tasmania. Together with the four species of echidna, it is one of the five species of monotremes, the only mammals that lay eggs instead of giving birth to live young. It is the sole living representative of its family and genus, though a number of related species have been found in the fossil record. The unique appearance of this egg-laying, duck-billed mammal baffled naturalists when it was first discovered, with some...

More Articles (4 articles) »
Word of the Day
omadhaun
  • A fool; a simpleton: a term of abuse common in Ireland and to a less extent in the Gaelic-speaking parts of Scotland.
This word is partly Irish in origin.