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Latest Mammal Stories

Leeches To Track Mammal DNA In Jungles
2012-04-24 06:10:55

Connie K. Ho for RedOrbit.com Researchers from Copenhagen Zoo and the University of Copenhagen have discovered a way to track mammals in the jungles of Southeast Asia. Scientists collected leeches from the jungles to analyze the blood and DNA of animals taken by the parasites. With this new method, researchers will be able to study the biodiversity of the mammals without having to track each one down. The findings, to be published in science journal Current Biology, allow scientists to...

Image 1 - Dinosaurs May Have Doomed Their Species By Laying Eggs
2012-04-18 14:10:50

New research suggests that the way dinosaurs reproduced could have led to their demise. According to research from the Zoological Society of London, dinosaurs became at risk when they began to lay eggs. Working together with colleagues, Daryl Codron and Marcus Clauss from the University of Zurich conducted this research into the possible beginning stages of the dinosaurs extinction. Their work has been published in the journal Biology Letters. The trouble could have been the sheer size of...

Omnivores Play For Both Teams
2012-04-17 10:34:47

Just because a bear prefers the taste of flesh today doesn´t mean it has always been so. A new study has investigated the previous eating habits of mammals, particularly omnivores, to discover how their eating habits have evolved. Large cats, such as lions and tigers are known carnivores, eating meat almost exclusively. On the other hand, other mammals such as cows, deer, and other livestock are herbivores, eating bark, grass, and fruit. Eating a mixture of plants and meat, however,...

2012-03-28 08:41:47

Almost all non-human mammals eat placenta for good reasons. Are we missing something? A paper by neuroscientists at the University at Buffalo and Buffalo State College suggests that ingestion of components of afterbirth or placenta -- placentophagia -- may offer benefits to human mothers and perhaps to non-mothers and males. They say this possibility does not warrant the wholesale ingestion of afterbirth, for some very good reasons, but that it deserves further study. Mark Kristal,...

2012-03-22 21:12:38

Endocannabinoids motivated the evolution of exercise In the last century something unexpected happened: humans became sedentary. We traded in our active lifestyles for a more immobile existence. But these were not the conditions under which we evolved. David Raichlen from the University of Arizona, USA, explains that our hunter-gatherer predecessors were long-distance endurance athletes. 'Aerobic activity has played a role in the evolution of lots of different systems in the human body,...

Mammals Flourished During Last 20 Million Years Of Dinosaur Era
2012-03-15 13:49:21

New research suggests that some mammals flourished during the last 20 million years of the dinosaurs' reign. University of Washington paleontologist Gregory P. Wilson suggests the multituberculates, a rodent-like creature, did so well during this time because they developed numerous tubercles on their back teeth that allowed them to feed on flowering plants back then. “These mammals were able to radiate in terms of numbers of species, body size and shapes of their teeth, which...

2012-03-14 13:48:48

Conventional wisdom holds that during the Mesozoic Era, mammals were small creatures that held on at life's edges. But at least one mammal group, rodent-like creatures called multituberculates, actually flourished during the last 20 million years of the dinosaurs' reign and survived their extinction 66 million years ago. New research led by a University of Washington paleontologist suggests that the multituberculates did so well in part because they developed numerous tubercles (bumps, or...

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2012-03-12 10:07:19

These days, only four species of Sirenian, more commonly known as the seacow, manatee or dugong exist in a given world region. Smithsonian scientists, however, have been studying fossil records of the ancient mammals and have discovered evidence that this hasn´t always been the case. According to these fossil records, which date back 50 million years ago, multiple species of seacow once existed together. The research also suggests the environment these seacows resided within, as well as...

Ancient Camels From Panama Canal Excavation Named
2012-03-01 05:03:30

The discovery of two new extinct camel species by University of Florida scientists sheds new light on the history of the tropics, a region containing more than half the world's biodiversity and some of its most important ecosystems. Appearing online this week in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, the study is the first published description of a fossil mammal discovered as part of an international project in Panama. Funded with a grant from the National Science Foundation, UF...

Mammals Evolve From Size Of Mouse To Elephant In 24M Generations
2012-01-31 05:52:40

Mammals can evolve from the size of a mouse to the size of an elephant in as little as 24 million generations, although they shrink more than 10 times as fast as they grow to large sizes, according to new research reported Monday by an international team of biologists and paleontologists. The study is the first of its kind to measure how fast large-scale evolution can occur in mammals. The researchers explored increases and decreases in mammal size following the extinction of dinosaurs...


Latest Mammal Reference Libraries

42_e96da6f440fbe9416f53bf5be8b5f8e3
2007-06-25 07:54:33

The Aardvark, Orycteropus afer, sometimes called the "˜antbear', is a medium-sized mammal native to Africa. It lives south of the Sahara desert where there is suitable habitat for them to live. It prefers savannas, grasslands, woodlands and bush. They are not found in deserts but are found in areas where there is a good supply of ants and termites. The most distinctive characteristic of the Aardvark is their teeth. Instead of having a pulp cavity, they have a number of thin tubes of...

42_767deb25d6255da2c5d97b07d1e38516
2007-01-19 11:46:11

The European Mole, Talpa europaea, is a mammal of the order Soricomorpha. This mole lives in an underground tunnel system, which it constantly extends. It uses these tunnels to hunt its prey. Under normal conditions the displaced earth is pushed to the surface, resulting in the characteristic "mole hills". It has a cylindrical body and is around 5 1/4 inches (12 cm) long. Females are typically smaller than males. The eyes are small, and hidden behind fur. Its ear is just a small ridge...

42_f294be1ec1fa65e8319af46dc77bf24b
2006-12-12 11:27:08

The platypus is a semi-aquatic endemic to eastern Australia and Tasmania. Together with the four species of echidna, it is one of the five species of monotremes, the only mammals that lay eggs instead of giving birth to live young. It is the sole living representative of its family and genus, though a number of related species have been found in the fossil record. The unique appearance of this egg-laying, duck-billed mammal baffled naturalists when it was first discovered, with some...

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