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Latest Mammary ductal carcinoma Stories

2008-07-08 09:00:13

By Lois M. Collins Deseret News In Tanzania, a woman might never be screened for breast cancer. If she is screened, it's because something seems to be wrong. There are no high-tech tools, it's a manual exam. And when cancer is found, it's likely well advanced. Treatment is limited to surgical removal of the breast, something many of the women reject. So for all those reasons, women who could be successfully treated somewhere else may die simply because of geography. Tanzania offers little...

2008-06-24 15:01:52

By JUDY SIEGEL-ITZKOVICH You don't have to be Jewish to get breast cancer, but it "helps." Women in developed countries have a one-in-nine to one-in- seven lifetime risk of this disease, with about 90 percent of breast cancer developing spontaneously and not as a result of inheriting the well-known BRCA 1 or BRCA 2 genes. No study so far has shown that breast cancer is more common in Jewish women than in the population at large. Yet it is clear that over the millennia, due to...

2008-03-19 03:00:09

By Adair, Jamie D Harvey, Kyle P; Mahmood, Ali; Caralis, James; Gordon, William; Yanish, Gregory Mucinous carcinoma of the breast, also known as colloid carcinoma, is a less common variant of breast cancer constituting less than five per cent of breast cancers. We report the case of a 42-year-old premenopausal female who presented with a palpable chest wall recurrence 4 years after simple mastectomy, axillary node dissection, and TRAM flap reconstruction for pure mucinous carcinoma. The...

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2008-01-22 19:34:36

According to a two-year study released on Monday in the January issue of the Archives of Surgery, breast surgery complications are more common than previously estimated. The study revealed that more than one in twenty patients who had breast surgery developed infections at incision sites. This number is incredibly high compared to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's estimate of a two percent infection rate. The rate is actually closer to 5.3 percent, or 50 out of 950...

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2008-01-10 15:50:00

Nancy Wong and Tracey King set out to investigate a boggling health phenomenon: American women are choosing overly aggressive treatments for breast cancer.  In 1990, a consensus recommendation from the National Institutes of Health said that the treatment of choice for early breast cancer was lumpectomy plus radiation. Despite this recommendation, the United States has the highest rate of mastectomy surgery among industrialized countries. Even though 82 percent of physicians...

2007-11-29 06:00:08

By Grabowski, Julia Salzstein, Sidney L; Sadler, Georgia R; Blair, Sarah L Malignant phyllodes tumor (MPT) is a rare breast malignancy. Because of the scarcity of the disease, there are no evidence-based treatment or follow-up guidelines established. This study evaluated the survival of MPT patients to create recommendations for management. We identified 752 cases of malignant phyllodes tumors in the California Cancer Registry from the years 1988 to 2003. Relative survival was determined...

2006-12-18 12:00:00

By ED SUSMAN Doctors said Monday that treating certain breast-cancer patients with surgery alone -- or without standard courses of radiation -- resulted in a low 6-percent risk of the cancer returning within five years. For some women, that level of risk may be acceptable, Lorie Hughes, clinical associate professor of medicine at Emory University in Atlanta, told United Press International. However, Hughes said that going without radiation is certainly not for everyone. "We know that...

2006-07-06 06:10:00

LONDON -- A booster dose of radiotherapy may help stop young women with very early breast cancer from progressing to a more serious form of the disease, researchers said on Thursday. Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a pre-cancer that occurs in cells lining the breast milk ducts. It is contained within the ducts and has not yet spread to the surrounding breast tissue. Surgery is usually performed to remove the cells and stop the cancer returning. If the DCIS is extensive, a mastectomy may be...

2006-06-08 14:04:24

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Women who carry mutations in the BRCA-1 or BRCA-2 genes have a high risk of developing breast cancer, and of having a recurrence. For such women with early breast cancer who desire breast-conserving surgery rather than a full mastectomy, extra treatments can help. Specifically, ovary removal or taking tamoxifen reduces the risk of cancer recurring in the same breast, down to levels no higher than among sporadic cases of breast cancer, study results...

2006-04-07 19:38:33

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Most women who have a breast removed to prevent a second bout of cancer don't regret their decision, a new study suggests. The study surveyed 519 women who'd had cancer in one breast but decided to have both breasts removed in order to avoid a recurrence. Overall, researchers found, 87 percent said they were still satisfied with their decision, as long as 23 years after the fact. What's more, they were just as likely as women who did not have a preventive...


Word of the Day
toccata
  • In music, a work for a keyboard-instrument, like the pianoforte or organ, originally intended to utilize and display varieties of touch: but the term has been extended so as to include many irregular works, similar to the prelude, the fantasia, and the improvisation.
This word is Italian in origin, coming from the feminine past participle of 'toccare,' to touch.
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