Quantcast

Latest Mantis shrimp Stories

Predatory Characteristics Of Extinct Sea Scorpion Reexamined
2014-07-11 10:42:07

Gerard LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Scientist from Yale University studied the extinct pterygotid eurypterid, a giant sea scorpion, the largest arthropod that ever lived. It was always believed to be a fierce predator, but a recent study revealed that may not have been the case. The paper titled, “What big eyes you have: The ecological role of giant pterygotid eurypterids,” is published in the journal Biology Letters. Ross Anderson, a Yale graduate student and...

Built-in Biological Sunscreen Allows Mantis Shrimp To See The Reef In A Whole Different Light
2014-07-04 03:48:19

Cell Press In an unexpected discovery, researchers have found that the complex eyes of mantis shrimp are equipped with optics that generate ultraviolet (UV) color vision. Mantis shrimp's six UV photoreceptors pick up on different colors within the UV spectrum based on filters made from an ingredient other animals depend on as built-in biological sunscreen, according to research reported in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on July 3. "The mantis shrimp visual system contains six...

Mantis Shrimp Is Stronger Than Airplanes
2014-04-23 03:00:09

Sean Nealon, University of California, Riverside Inspired by mantis shrimp, researchers design composite material stronger than standard used in airplane frames Inspired by the fist-like club of a mantis shrimp, a team of researchers led by University of California, Riverside, in collaboration with University of Southern California and Purdue University, have developed a design structure for composite materials that is more impact resistant and tougher than the standard used in...

Spearing Mantis Shrimp Uses Muscle Power To Attack Enemy
2012-11-23 13:23:57

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Spearing mantis shrimp must eat plenty of spinach, because scientists have determined it is their muscle power that thrusts them towards their enemy's doom. The lobster-sized shrimp stay in their sandy burrow and wait for prey to come by, and then from out of nowhere, shoot out and grab the next meal with their long skinny appendages. Scientists were not sure how these predators were able to unleash their lightning-fast...

2012-06-13 10:29:50

A scientist from Nanyang Technological University (NTU) may be onto an ocean of discovery because of his research into a little sea creature called the mantis shrimp. The research is likely to lead to making ceramics — today´s preferred material for medical implants and military body armor — many times stronger. These findings were published in last Friday's Science, the world's top scientific journal, and focused on the mantis shrimp´s ability to shatter aquarium...

Shrimp Fight Club: 'Holy Grail For Materials Engineers'
2012-06-08 09:50:14

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com Engineers at the University of California, Riverside are looking to nature for inspiration in creating stronger vehicle frames and body armor. They may have found a key structure in the club-like claw of the sea floor-dwelling mantis shrimp, according to a report published online this week in the journal Science. The 4-inch crustacean, also known as a stomatopod, uses its claw with the deadly speed of a 22-caliber bullet to crack open everything from crab...

0004ab6ace55af32e6f1d7e84f0002a3
2011-06-27 07:20:33

The eye of the peacock mantis shrimp has led an international team of researchers to develop a two-part waveplate that could improve CD, DVD, blu-ray and holographic technology, creating even higher definition and larger storage density. Peacock mantis shrimp are one of only a few animal species that can see circularly polarized light -- like the light used to create 3-D movies. Some researchers believe the mantis shrimp's eyes are better over the entire visual spectrum than any man-made...

a50f81d94f006c5859b8917eec3066ce1
2009-10-26 10:30:00

The next generation of optical devices could borrow inspiration from the spectacular eyes of the mantis shrimp. Reporting in Nature Photonics, researchers from the University of Bristol said mantis shrimps from the Australia's Great Barrier Reef have the most complex eyes known to man. The shrimp's eyes can see in twelve colors and distinguish between different forms of polarized light. By comparison, humans can only see in three colors. Researchers said the marine crustaceans' have special...

f8cac9bd71a0c4fca5257f48efae2d781
2008-03-20 02:10:00

Mantis shrimp can see the world in a way that had never been observed in any animal before, researchers report in the March 20th Current Biology, a Cell Press publication. The discovery"”which marks the fourth type of visual system"”suggests that the ability to perceive circular polarized light may lend mantis shrimp a secret mode of communication. "Mantis shrimp ventured into a new dimension of vision," said Justin Marshall of the University of Queensland in Australia. Also known...

d9be429b177fdcbafd89f6fcece9d4e11
2006-08-22 07:50:00

WASHINGTON -- A tiny ant has the fastest jaw in the animal kingdom - literally quicker than the blink of an eye. The trap-jaw ant's scientific name may be ponderous, Odontomachus bauri, but this hunter can clamp its mandibles shut at between 78 mph and 145 mph, according to a report in Monday's online edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. That makes it faster than the mantis shrimp, former record holder for fastest strike, according to researchers led by Sheila Patek,...


Word of the Day
virgule
  • A punctuation mark (/) used to separate related items of information.
  • A little rod; a twig.
This word comes from the Late Latin 'virgula,' accentual mark, a diminutive of 'virga,' rod.
Related