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Latest Mantle Stories

volcano mantle plume theory wrong
2014-09-10 11:26:57

Marcus Woo, California Institute of Technology In the typical textbook picture, volcanoes, such as those that are forming the Hawaiian islands, erupt when magma gushes out as narrow jets from deep inside Earth. But that picture is wrong, according to a new study from researchers at Caltech and the University of Miami in Florida. New seismology data are now confirming that such narrow jets don't actually exist, says Don Anderson, the Eleanor and John R. McMillian Professor of Geophysics,...

An Ocean's Worth Of Water May Be Sitting In North American Mantle
2014-06-13 10:28:29

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online While all of Earth’s oceans may seem like more than enough water for one planet, a new study published in the journal Science has revealed an ocean’s worth of water may be sitting in the mantle, hundreds of miles below North America. According to the study, molecular water is stored away in a mineral called ringwoodite about 400 miles below the Earth’s surface. The study team said this stored water is sitting in a transition...

2014-05-23 13:27:42

Carnegie Institution Breaking research news from a team of scientists led by Carnegie's Ho-kwang "Dave" Mao reveals that the composition of the Earth's lower mantle may be significantly different than previously thought. These results are to be published by Science. The lower mantle comprises 55 percent of the planet by volume and extends from 670 and 2900 kilometers in depth, as defined by the so-called transition zone (top) and the core-mantle boundary (below). Pressures in the lower...

Earth core structure shutterstock_179800859
2014-04-05 06:41:23

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The contours of the Earth's crust are influenced by the high temperatures deep within the Earth's mantle, according to a new study published in Science. A team of researchers, led by Brown University, demonstrated that those temperature differences control the elevation and volcanic activity along mid-ocean ridges, the colossal mountain ranges that line the ocean floor. Forming at the boundaries of tectonic plates, mid-ocean ridges...

Researchers Develop New Model Of Earth's Dynamic Interior
2014-03-31 14:24:13

[ Watch The Video: Researchers Develop New Model Of Earth’s Dynamic Interior ] Nikki Cassis, Arizona State University Seeking to better understand the composition of the lowermost part of Earth’s mantle, located nearly 2,900 kilometers (1,800 miles) below the surface, a team of Arizona State University researchers has developed new simulations that depict the dynamics of deep Earth. A paper published March 30 in Nature Geoscience reports the team’s findings, which could be...

earthquake
2014-03-05 04:54:55

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study published in the journal Science reveals new information about the forces behind earthquakes. Geoscientists from the University of California, Los Angeles used a technique known as seismic tomography to study the structure of the Pacific Plate. This technique helped the team determine the plate’s thickness and image the interior of the plate and the underlying mantle, which they were able to relate to the direction of...

Oceans Earths Mantle
2014-01-27 13:52:44

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online University of Liverpool scientists believe that up to three and a half times the water of all the Earth’s oceans could be being transported beneath our feet. Seismologists reported in the journal Geology that they found deep sea fault zones could transport much larger amounts of water from Earth’s oceans to the upper mantle than previously thought. The team analyzed earthquakes that occurred more than 60 miles below the Earth’s...

Dense Earth Crust Was Recycled Into The Mantle During Archean Eon
2013-12-31 07:31:36

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online The temperature of the Earth’s mantle during the Archean eon some four billion years ago was significantly higher than it is today, causing the crust to become unstable and drip back down into the mantle, according to research published this month in Nature Geoscience. As part of the study, Dr. Tim Johnson of the Institute of Geosciences at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and his colleagues created model calculations...

New Evidence Gives New Life To ‘Percolation’ Theory For Earth’s Core
2013-10-08 17:23:32

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com – Your Universe Online Scientists writing in the journal Nature Geoscience say that a similar process to that which allows water to yank oils from ground coffee  in order to make a cup of joe in the morning, could be how the Earth's core formed. Stanford University scientists recreated the intense pressures and temperatures inside Earth and found that an iron melt network may have helped grow the Earth's core. The finding revisits a theory first proposed...

2013-09-24 13:34:49

Scientists broke new ground in the study of deep earthquakes, a poorly understood phenomenon that occurs where the oceanic lithosphere, driven by tectonics, plunges under continental plates – examples are off the coasts of the western United States, Russia and Japan. This research is a large step toward replicating the full power of these earthquakes to learn what sets them off and how they unleash their violence. It was made possible only by the construction of a one-of-a-kind X-ray...


Latest Mantle Reference Libraries

Kelp Scallop, Leptopecten latiauratus
2013-04-16 20:25:12

Leptopecten latiauratus, the common name being the kelp scallop, is a small saltwater clam, a bivalve mollusk belonging to the family Pectinidae. It resides in water up to 850 feet deep. Similar to other scallops, it has many small primitive eyes around the rim of its mantle and escapes its predators by jet propulsion. The shell can be anywhere between 3 to 5 centimeters in size. It is mostly circular with two flat auricles or ears that extend off of the hinge. It usually has ridges that...

4_33609f8ebef994f54be143abe0bef9f42
2004-10-19 04:45:40

Earth -- in geology and astronomy, fifth largest planet of the solar system and the only planet definitely known to support life. Gravitational forces have molded the earth, like all celestial bodies, into a spherical shape. However, the earth is not an exact sphere, being slightly flattened at the poles and bulging at the equator. The equatorial diameter is c.7,926 mi (12,760 km) and the polar diameter 7,900 mi (12,720 km); the circumference at the equator is c.24,830 mi (40,000 km)....

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Word of the Day
reremouse
  • A bat.
The word 'reremouse' comes from Middle English reremous, from Old English hrēremūs, hrērmūs ("bat"), equivalent to rear (“to move, shake, stir”) +‎ mouse.
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