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Latest Marcus Kronforst Stories

A Single Gene Controls Wing Mimicry In Butterflies
2014-03-05 14:04:36

University of Chicago A single gene regulates the complex wing patterns, colors and structures required for mimicry in swallowtail butterflies, report scientists from the University of Chicago, March 5 in Nature. Surprisingly, the gene described, doublesex, is already well-known for its critical role in sexual differentiation in insects. "Conventional wisdom says that it should be multiple genes working together to control the whole wing pattern of a butterfly," said Marcus Kronforst,...

Butterflies Offer Insights Into Evolution
2013-10-31 16:39:31

Michael Harper for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study from the University of Chicago finds it’s genetically easier to spin off into a new species than it may have once been thought, even if the two species remain close and interbreed with one another. After studying butterflies, the researchers found evolution can happen as the result of a process rather than a single event. In fact, in the case of butterflies, the beginning of a new species could begin with something as...

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2009-11-06 07:12:10

Scientists find a population of butterflies that appears to be splitting into 2 species Breaking up may actually not be hard to do, say scientists who've found a population of tropical butterflies that may be on its way to a split into two distinct species. The cause of this particular break-up? A shift in wing color and mate preference. In a paper published this week in the journal Science, the researchers describe the relationship between diverging color patterns in Heliconius butterflies...


Word of the Day
siliqua
  • A Roman unit of weight, 1⁄1728 of a pound.
  • A weight of four grains used in weighing gold and precious stones; a carat.
  • In anatomy, a formation suggesting a husk or pod.
  • The lowest unit in the Roman coinage, the twenty-fourth part of a solidus.
  • A coin of base silver of the Gothic and Lombard kings of Italy.
'Siliqua' comes from a Latin word meaning 'a pod.'
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