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Last updated on April 23, 2014 at 13:25 EDT

Latest Marcus Roper Stories

Fungus Cell Looks Like The 405 Freeway
2013-07-18 10:17:49

UCLA [ Watch the Video Nuclear dynamics in a fungal chimera ] No, those are not cars darting along a busy highway. The glowing specks you're seeing in this video are millions of nuclei flowing through the tube-like filaments, or hyphae, of a single fungus cell. The video was produced as part of a study by UCLA mathematician Marcus Roper's research group that was the first to measure and explain this dynamic movement of nuclei in the cells of a fungus. "It's complex, beautiful and...

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2010-09-28 06:20:00

By Robert Sanders, UC Berkeley Hydrodynamic model of spore plumes explains how plume gives spores an extra oomph Long before geese started flying in chevron formation or cyclists learned the value of drafting, fungi discovered an aerodynamic way to reduce drag on their spores so as to spread them as high and as far as possible. One fungus, the destructive Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, spews thousands of spores nearly simultaneously to form a plume that reduces drag to nearly zero and even creates...

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2008-12-23 12:45:25

Phenomenon seen among spores dispersed by air flow, but not among animal-borne spores The reproductive spores of many species of fungi have evolved remarkably drag-minimizing shapes, according to new research by mycologists and applied mathematicians at Harvard University. In many cases, the scientists report this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the drag experienced by these fungal spores is within one percent of the absolute minimum possible drag for their size....