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Latest Marine mammals Stories

2008-09-26 18:00:36

By PAUL WEIDEMAN I Do the right whale thing Paul Weideman I The New Mexican Whaledreamers, documentary on interspecies connection, not rated, The Film Center, 988-7414 Whales bring people together to save the Earth. That's the bottom line of Whaledreamers, a 2007 documentary written and directed by Kim Kindersley. The film records a 1998 gathering of tribal leaders from around the world at the Nullarbor Cliffs in South Australia. The ceremonial gathering was called by...

2008-09-17 09:00:31

Text of report in English by Taiwanese Central News Agency website [By Elizabeth Hsu] Taipei, Sept. 17 (CNA) - A Canadian scientist dedicated to the preservation of aquatic mammals urged the Taiwan government Wednesday to take immediate action to protect an isolated and endangered population of dolphins that is found only in the eastern Taiwan Strait. Peter S. Ross, a marine mammal toxicologist at the Department of Fisheries and Oceans in Canada, made the call at a press conference held...

2008-09-15 15:00:34

Kelly, Napier Marineland's last dolphin probably died of cancer, a team of Massey University researchers determined yesterday. A tumour the size of a mandarin was discovered inside the otherwise healthy dolphin during a post- mortem examination at Massey's Veterinary Teaching Hospital. The 38-year-old dolphin had been unwell for several days and died on Wednesday. She had been at Napier's Marineland since 1974. Wildlife health centre director Dr Brett Gartrell said the main...

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2008-09-15 14:24:54

A new report warns that levels of noise in the world's oceans are causing serious problems for whales, dolphins and other marine mammals. Undersea noise blocks animals' communication and disrupts feeding, according to the International Fund for Animal Welfare (Ifaw). Some say naval sonar has been linked to the mass deaths of some cetaceans. The level of ocean noise in some regions is doubling each decade and Ifaw says protective measures are failing. "Humanity is literally drowning out marine...

2008-08-02 15:00:12

By Anna Ferguson, The Brunswick News, Ga. Aug. 2--The southern Georgia and northern Florida coastline could see fewer live bombs if an environmental safety document wins the approval of the U.S. Navy. If the Jacksonville Range Complex Environmental Impact Statement gets the go-ahead from the Navy, live explosions would be replaced with non-explosive bombs. That would be good news for boaters and marine life. It would equate to fewer disturbances on the water and less risk for...

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2008-07-23 16:10:00

A U.S. team of researchers found that female bottlenose dolphins whistle 10 times more often than usual after giving birth in order to help newborns recognize their own mothers. These "signature whistles" are unique to each animal, allowing them to be used for identification. The highly social bottlenose dolphins use the signature calls to help baby calves in their first weeks of life. The calves encounter many adult females that they could potentially mistake for their mothers. "The...

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2008-07-07 09:58:12

Four weeks on from the shocking incident that led to the death of 26 dolphins near Falmouth, research released Monday sheds new light on the extent of the problems facing Cornwall's marine mammals. A study by the University of Exeter and Cornwall Wildlife Trust, published in the journal Biodiversity and Conservation, has revealed a disturbing rise in the number of whales, dolphins and porpoises found dead on Cornish beaches. The frequency of these mammals, collectively known as cetaceans,...

2008-07-02 12:00:00

By David Sneed, The Tribune, San Luis Obispo, Calif. Jul. 1--A new federal report confirms that California's sea otter population is growing, albeit at a slower rate in recent years. Averaged over three years, the population grew by a tiny 0.3 percent over the past year, according to the results of the most recent annual population survey of the southern sea otter. The iconic coastal species is listed as threatened on the endangered species list. This year's individual survey...

2008-06-10 17:09:35

Chemicals produced by humans have been found in deep-sea squid and other creatures, further evidence that contaminants make their way deep into the marine food web, scientists said Monday. Researchers found a variety of chemical contaminants in nine species of cephalopods, which include octopods, squids, cuttlefishes and nautiluses. These species are food for dolphins, narwhals, killer whales and other toothed whales. The researchers collected nine species of cephalopods up to a...

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2008-05-15 11:40:00

Under the sea, predatory pilot whales take part in high-speed chases as they track down their prey.The cetaceans have been observed reaching such high speeds that scientists have likened their hunting technique to that of the cheetah, according to researchers in the Journal of Animal Ecology.Their findings may dispel the common notion of whales as large slow creatures.The research is the first to document the remarkable "burst-speed" of the pilot whale."As far as we know, no other whale has...


Latest Marine mammals Reference Libraries

Marine Otter, Lontra feline
2012-12-28 15:09:41

The marine otter (Lontra feline) is a member of the weasel family, and can be found in South America. It prefers a habitat in rocky coastal areas, with a range that includes the entire coastline of Chile and extends to southern Peru and Argentina. It has been found on the Falkland Islands, but individuals here do not represent a constant population. Unlike other species of otter, the marine otter chooses to live near waters with high winds and swells. It may use caves and crevices as dens,...

Crabeater Seal, Lobodon carcinophagus
2012-06-26 14:40:11

The crabeater seal (Lobodon carcinophagus) is a true seal that can be found around the whole of Antarctica. Its range also includes small areas in South America, New Zealand, Africa, and Australia. It resides on the pack ice zone for the entire year, even as it shifts seasonally, and prefers to stay in the continental shelf area in water with a depth of less than 1,968 feet. Because the populations are so wide spread and are sufficiently mixed, there have been no subspecies found. Because...

Mediterranean Monk Seal, Monachus monachus
2012-06-23 10:50:34

The Mediterranean monk seal (Monachus monachus) is a rare pinniped, or “fin-footed mammal” that can be found in areas of the Mediterranean Sea, as well as in the Atlantic waters of the Tropic of Cancer. Not much is known about the chosen land habitats of this seal, but until the 20th century, it could be seen relaxing or pup rearing on open beaches. It now dwells in underwater caves and caverns in order to escape human actions including tourism and expansion. The Mediterranean monk...

Profilicollis
2014-01-05 00:00:00

Profilicollis is a genus of acanthocephalan parasites that are found in crustaceans and shorebirds. Profilicollis parasites use decapod crustaceans as intermediate hosts and species of shorebirds as definitive hosts. The parasite first develops in mole crabs of North and South America. After it infects a mole crab, it becomes dormant until the crab is eaten by a suitable bird, such as a Surf scoter or Herring Gull. Once the parasite has passed through the stomach of the bird, it develops...

Chinese White Dolphin, Sousa chinensis chinensis (known as rare pink dolphins)
2012-05-25 11:45:30

The Chinese white dolphin, otherwise known as the Indo-Pacific humpback dolphin, is a species of humpback dolphin that can be found in the waters of Southeast Asia. When breeding, they will travel to the waters around South Africa to Australia.  There are currently two recognized subspecies of the Chinese white dolphin. The coloring of the Chinese white dolphin can vary due to age and location. When born, calves are actually black, but will change to grey, then pink with white spotting,...

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Word of the Day
humgruffin
  • A terrible or repulsive person.
Regarding the etymology of 'humgruffin,' the OED says (rather unhelpfully) that it's a 'made-up word.' We might guess that 'hum' comes from 'humbug' or possibly 'hum' meaning 'a disagreeable smell,' while 'gruffin' could be a combination of 'gruff' and 'griffin.'