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Latest Markus Buehler Stories

Mussels Help Create Artificial Tendons
2013-07-24 11:54:52

Michael Harper for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online MIT researchers have discovered precisely why mussels are able to stick to slick surfaces so well, even when faced with stiff currents and rocking waves. And beyond unraveling one more of nature's little secrets, the researchers believe they can use this information to help repair human tendons. Mussels use filaments called byssus threads to adhere to piers, rocks and more. These byssus threads allow the mussels to stray out a...

Scientists Use 3D Printer To Print Artificial Bone
2013-06-17 18:09:42

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Instead of looking to simply replace natural structures through artificial means, a group of MIT materials scientists are looking to create nature-inspired structures that actually outperform the original. Using 3D printing technology, MIT scientists have developed a process that allows them to turn designs into physical fracture-resistant, bone-like structures within just a few hours, according to their report in the...

Scientists Search For Spider Web's  Strength
2012-02-02 09:38:05

Scientists report that they have solved the riddle of how spider webs can withstand different levels of stress - including hurricane force winds - without collapsing. Researchers, led by Markus Buehler of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), used computer simulations to find out how silk structures respond to different levels of stress. What they found was quite remarkable. Reporting in the journal Nature, the researchers found that web durability does not only rely on silk...

2011-09-14 22:11:45

Pulling the tail of mutated protein could help illuminate problems with misfolding Researchers at MIT and Carnegie Mellon University are using both civil engineering and bioengineering approaches to study the behavior of a protein associated with progeria, a rare disorder in children that causes extremely rapid aging and usually ends in death from cardiovascular disease before age 16. The disease is marked by the deletion of 50 amino acids near the end of the lamin A protein, which helps...

2009-08-04 14:26:21

The weak tendons and fragile bones characteristic of osteogenesis imperfecta, or brittle bone disease, stem from a genetic mutation that causes the incorrect substitution of a single amino acid in the chain of thousands of amino acids making up a collagen molecule, the basic building block of bone and tendon. According to researchers at MIT, that minuscule encoding error creates a defective collagen molecule that, at the site of the amino acid substitution, repels rather than attracts the...

2009-06-01 11:38:56

Nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) devices have the potential to revolutionize the world of sensors: motion, chemical, temperature, etc. But taking electromechanical devices from the micro scale down to the nano requires finding a means to dissipate the heat output of this tiny gadgetry.In a paper appearing in the March 26 issue of Nano Letters, Professor Markus Buehler and postdoctoral associate Zhiping Xu of MIT's Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering say the solution is to...

2009-02-05 10:14:44

MIT researchers who study the structure of protein-based materials with the aim of learning the key to their lightweight and robust strength have discovered that the particular arrangement of proteins that produces the sturdiest product is not the arrangement with the most built-in redundancy or the most complicated pattern. Instead, the optimal arrangement of proteins in the rope-like structures they studied is a repeated pattern of two stacks of four bundled alpha-helical proteins.This...


Word of the Day
siliqua
  • A Roman unit of weight, 1⁄1728 of a pound.
  • A weight of four grains used in weighing gold and precious stones; a carat.
  • In anatomy, a formation suggesting a husk or pod.
  • The lowest unit in the Roman coinage, the twenty-fourth part of a solidus.
  • A coin of base silver of the Gothic and Lombard kings of Italy.
'Siliqua' comes from a Latin word meaning 'a pod.'
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