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Latest Mars landing Stories

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2008-11-17 12:50:00

As much as a third of Mars could have been underwater, UA scientists say An international team of scientists who analyzed data from the Gamma Ray Spectrometer onboard NASA's Mars Odyssey reports new evidence for the controversial idea that oceans once covered about a third of ancient Mars. "We compared Gamma Ray Spectrometer data on potassium, thorium and iron above and below a shoreline believed to mark an ancient ocean that covered a third of Mars' surface, and an inner shoreline believed...

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2008-11-10 16:05:00

NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander has ceased communications after operating for more than five months. As anticipated, seasonal decline in sunshine at the robot's arctic landing site is not providing enough sunlight for the solar arrays to collect the power necessary to charge batteries that operate the lander's instruments. Mission engineers last received a signal from the lander on Nov. 2. Phoenix, in addition to shorter daylight, has encountered a dustier sky, more clouds and colder temperatures...

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2008-10-16 06:55:00

European space scientists are getting closer to unravelling the origin of Mars' larger moon, Phobos. Thanks to a series of close encounters by ESA's Mars Express spacecraft, the moon looks almost certain to be a "Ëœrubble pile', rather than a single solid object. However, mysteries remain about where the rubble came from. Unlike Earth, with its single large moon, Mars plays host to two small moons. The larger one is Phobos, an irregularly sized lump of space rock measuring just...

2008-09-30 09:00:11

By MARC KAUFMAN By Marc Kaufman The Washington Post WASHINGTON Icy snow falls from high in the Martian atmosphere and may even reach the planet's surface, scientists working with NASA's Phoenix Mars lander reported Monday. Laser instruments aboard the lander detected the snow in clouds about 2 1/2 miles above the surface and followed the precipitation as it fell more than a mile toward the ground. But because of limitations with the technology, it was unclear whether any of the...

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2008-09-25 14:58:52

PASADENA, Calif. "“ NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter has revealed hundreds of small fractures exposed on the Martian surface that billions of years ago directed flows of water through underground Martian sandstone. Researchers used images from the spacecraft's High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment, or HiRISE, camera. Images of layered rock deposits at equatorial Martian sites show the clusters of fractures to be a type called deformation bands, caused by stresses below the...

2008-09-20 12:15:00

What it's doing * The three-legged Phoenix spacecraft is studying whether the the Martian north pole could have been favorable for microbial life to emerge. How much? * The space agency will invest about $6 million to keep the $422 million mission going through December. Why it matters * Phoenix is the first craft to touch Martian ice with its robotic arm. It will turn into a weather station once its digging job is finished. (c) 2008 Charleston Daily Mail. Provided by ProQuest LLC. All...

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2008-09-15 16:00:00

NASA has selected a Mars robotic mission that will provide information about the Red Planet's atmosphere, climate history and potential habitability in greater detail than ever before. Called the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) spacecraft, the $485 million mission is scheduled for launch in late 2013. The selection was evaluated to have the best science value and lowest implementation risk from 20 mission investigation proposals submitted in response to a NASA Announcement of...

2008-08-01 12:00:04

By Stephanie Innes, The Arizona Daily Star, Tucson Aug. 1--The red planet really does have water. The Phoenix Mars Mission led by the University of Arizona has made history by scientifically proving, for the first time, that water exists on a planet other than Earth. "We have water," the UA's William V. Boynton, a lead scientist on the NASA mission, announced Thursday in Tucson. "We've done most of the things we need to do for a fully successful mission," Boynton added. "It is a...

2008-08-01 00:00:02

By Ben Clover NASA HAS confirmed that the Phoenix Mars Lander has identified one of the crucial ingredients for life in a soil sample. "We have water," said William Boynton of the University of Arizona, one of the lead scientists monitoring the mission, . "We've now finally touched it and tasted it. From my standpoint, it tastes very fine." Scientists popped open champagne when they received confirmation that the soil contained ice. Until now, evidence of ice in Mars's north pole region...

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2008-07-16 15:05:00

WASHINGTON -- Two studies based on data from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter have revealed that the Red Planet once hosted vast lakes, flowing rivers and a variety of other wet environments that had the potential to support life. One study, published in the July 17 issue of Nature, shows that vast regions of the ancient highlands of Mars, which cover about half the planet, contain clay minerals, which can form only in the presence of water. Volcanic lavas buried the clay-rich regions...


Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
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