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Latest Marshall Space Flight Center Stories

2011-07-27 12:53:00

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla., July 27, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- NASA's Juno spacecraft completed its last significant terrestrial journey on Wednesday, with a 15-mile (25-kilometer) trip from Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., to its launch pad at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The solar-powered, Jupiter-bound spacecraft was secured into place on top of its rocket at 10:42 a.m. EDT (7:42 a.m. PDT). (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20081007/38461LOGO) Juno will...

2011-07-27 08:31:37

NASA's Juno spacecraft is set to launch toward Jupiter aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket on Aug. 5. The launch window extends from 11:34 a.m. to 12:33 p.m. EDT, and the launch period extends through Aug. 26. The spacecraft is expected to arrive at Jupiter in 2016 on a mission to investigate the gas giant's origins, structure, atmosphere and magnetosphere. Juno's color camera will provide close-up images of Jupiter, including the first detailed views of the planet's poles. NASA...

2011-07-07 10:32:48

NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida is entering into an agreement with Sierra Nevada Space Systems (SNSS) of Sparks, Nev., to offer technical capabilities from the center's uniquely skilled work force. The umbrella space act agreement is Kennedy's latest step in its transition from a historically government-only launch complex to a multi-user spaceport. Sierra Nevada also has space act agreements with NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston; NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Va.;...

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2011-07-06 10:00:00

NASA's Juno spacecraft is 30 days before its first launch window opens. "The launch window is the length of time allotted every day for an attempt to launch the spacecraft," said Jan Chodas, Juno project manager from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. "The launch period is the period of time in days when everything is in the right place to get your mission off to the right start." For a mission like Juno, getting everything in the right place includes considering the size of...

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2011-06-27 09:21:16

As the Juno spacecraft is elevated by a rotation fixture, a technician at Astrotech's payload processing facility in Titusville, Fla., examines the installation of blankets on the aft deck. The image was taken on June 16, 2011. Juno is scheduled to launch aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket from Cape Canaveral, Fla. on Aug. 5. The solar-powered spacecraft will orbit Jupiter's poles 33 times to find out more about the gas giant's origins, structure, atmosphere and magnetosphere and...

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2011-05-31 06:05:00

The three massive solar panels that will provide power for NASA's Juno spacecraft during its mission to Jupiter have seen their last photons of light until they are deployed in space after launch. The last of the Jupiter-bound spacecraft's panels completed pre-flight testing at the Astrotech payload processing facility in Titusville, Fla., and was folded against the side of the spacecraft into its launch configuration Thursday, May 26. The solar-powered Juno spacecraft will orbit Jupiter's...

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2011-05-24 08:19:47

NASA's twin lunar probes have arrived in Florida to begin final preparations for a launch in late summer. The two Gravity Recovery And Interior Laboratory spacecraft (Grail) were shipped from Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, to the Astrotech payload processing facility in Titusville, Fla., Friday, May 20. NASA's dynamic duo will orbit the moon to determine the structure of the lunar interior from crust to core and to advance understanding of the thermal evolution of the moon. "NASA's...

2011-05-23 14:57:00

DENVER, May 23, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- NASA's twin GRAIL spacecraft were delivered by its builder Lockheed Martin (NYSE: LMT) to Kennedy Space Center, Fla., on May 20. The two vehicles will undergo four months of final testing and processing in preparation for launch from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station on a United Launch Alliance Delta II Heavy launch vehicle in early September. PHOTOS: http://www.lockheedmartin.com/news/press_releases/2011/0523_ss_grail.html The lunar orbiters will...

2011-05-19 08:00:00

GREENBELT, Md., May 19, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- SGT, Inc., a leading provider of Engineering, Science, Project Management, and Information Technology services, today announced that Dr. James French joined SGT as Vice President for Launch Systems. Dr. French joins SGT with a focus on bolstering our engineering work in the Huntsville region. "Jim has been influential in aircraft and Space Shuttle programs and has made many contributions throughout his dynamic career," stated CEO and...

2011-05-04 12:00:00

WASHINGTON, May 4, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- NASA's Gravity Probe B (GP-B) mission has confirmed two key predictions derived from Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity, which the spacecraft was designed to test. (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20081007/38461LOGO) The experiment, launched in 2004, used four ultra-precise gyroscopes to measure the hypothesized geodetic effect, the warping of space and time around a gravitational body, and frame-dragging, the...


Latest Marshall Space Flight Center Reference Libraries

Owen Garriott
2012-10-02 10:26:07

Owen Garriott is a former United States Navy officer and NASA astronaut. He was born Owen Kay Garriott on November 22, 1930 in Enid, Oklahoma. In 1948 he graduated from Enid High School and then went on to attend the University of Oklahoma, where he earned a Bachelor of Science in electrical engineering in 1953. He subsequently joined the United States Navy and worked his way to the role of officer. However, just three years later Garriott decided to leave the Navy to pursue a higher...

14_77593c7bb21b1912746e8eac946bf4cf2
2013-03-16 00:00:00

Wernher von Braun (March 23, 1912 - June 16, 1977) was one of the leading figures in the development of rocket technology in Germany and the United States. His work on the Nazi rocket program made him a controversial figure. The controversy was captured in a song by satirist Tom Lehrer, who described him as "A man whose allegiance is ruled by expedience". He was born on in Wirsitz, Posen, Germany and his mother gave him a telescope upon his Lutheran confirmation. His interest in astronomy...

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