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Latest MARSIS Stories

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2006-03-08 06:35:00

WUSTL -- Two Mars orbiter missions - one from NASA, the other from the European Space Agency (ESA) - will open new vistas in the exploration of Mars through the use of sophisticated ground-penetrating radars, providing international researchers with the first direct clues about the Red Planet's subsurface structure. Roger Phillips, Ph.D., Washington University in St. Louis Professor of Earth and Planetary Sciences in Arts & Sciences, is participating in both the Mars Express (ESA) and...

2005-11-30 17:55:00

University of Iowa Space Physicist Don Gurnett and his UI colleagues report that a scientific instrument aboard the European Space Agency's (ESA) Mars Express spacecraft is working perfectly and that its data have so far revealed that Mars' ionosphere -- part of the upper atmosphere -- is very lumpy and complex, and that the instrument can "see" hidden craters and thick layers of ice beneath the planet's surface. Gurnett's findings were scheduled for presentation in the Thursday, Dec. 1...

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2005-11-30 12:12:05

ESA -- For the first time in the history of planetary exploration, the MARSIS radar on board ESA's Mars Express has provided direct information about the deep subsurface of Mars. First data include buried impact craters, probing of layered deposits at the north pole and hints of the presence of deep underground water-ice. The subsurface of Mars has been so far unexplored territory. Only glimpses of the Martian depths could be deduced through analysis of impact crater and valley walls, and by...

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2005-11-17 07:41:58

ESA -- The Mars Express radar, MARSIS, has now been deployed for more than four months. Here we report on the activities so far. For the operational period up to now, Mars Express has been making its closest approaches to Mars predominantly in the daytime portion of its orbit. The MARSIS radar's scientists are mainly collecting data about the upper layers of the Martian atmosphere, or "Ëœionosphere', which is the highly electrically conducting layer that is maintained by...

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2005-09-22 12:05:00

ESA -- ESA's Mars Express mission has been extended by one Martian year, or about 23 months, from the beginning of December 2005. The decision, taken on September 19 by ESA's Science Programme Committee, allows the spacecraft orbiting the Red Planet to continue building on the legacy of its own scientific success. Co-ordinated from the beginning with the Mars science and exploration activities of other agencies, Mars Express has revealed an increasingly complex picture of Mars. Since...

2005-09-14 06:40:28

ESA -- ESA has started a technical investigation into the Planetary Fourier Spectrometer (PFS) on board Mars Express, after a problem developed in the instrument a few months ago. Vibration effects (induced by spacecraft activities) have been suggested as a cause for the observed behaviour. However no source has yet been identified and other causes internal to the instrument cannot be fully ruled out. In order to establish the exact cause of the problem, ESA's Mars Express team is...

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2005-08-06 18:50:50

ESA -- MARSIS, the sounding radar on board ESA's Mars Express spacecraft, is collecting the first data about the surface and the ionosphere of Mars. The radar started its science operations on 4 July 2005, after the first phase of its commissioning was concluded on the same day. Due to the late deployment of MARSIS, it was decided to split the commissioning, originally planned to last four weeks, into two phases, one of which has just ended and the second one to be started by December...

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2005-06-24 06:05:00

Astrobiology Magazine -- MARSIS, the Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionosphere Sounding onboard ESA's Mars Express orbiter, is now fully deployed, has undergone its first checkout and is ready to start operations around the Red Planet. With this radar, the Mars Express orbiter at last has its full complement of instruments available to probe the planet's atmosphere, surface and subsurface structure. MARSIS consists of three antennas: two 'dipole' booms 20 metres long, and one 7-metre...

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2005-06-22 09:05:00

ESA -- MARSIS, the Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionosphere Sounding on board ESA's Mars Express orbiter, is now fully deployed, has undergone its first check-out and is ready to start operations around the Red Planet. With this radar, the Mars Express orbiter at last has its full complement of instruments available to probe the planet's atmosphere, surface and subsurface structure. MARSIS consists of three antennas: two "Ëœdipole' booms 20 metres long, and one 7-metre...

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2005-06-16 13:45:00

ESA -- The second 20-metre antenna boom of the MARSIS instrument on board Mars Express was successfully "“ and smoothly "“ deployed, confirmed today by the ground team at ESA's European Space Operations Centre. The command to deploy the second MARSIS boom was given to the spacecraft at 13:30 CEST on 13 June 2005. Shortly before the deployment started, Mars Express was set into a slow rotation to last 30 minutes during and after the boom extension. This rotation allowed all the...


Word of the Day
vermicular
  • Like a worm in form or movement; vermiform; tortuous or sinuous; also, writhing or wriggling.
  • Like the track or trace of a worm; appearing as if worm-eaten; vermiculate.
  • Marked with fine, close-set, wavy or tortuous lines of color; vermiculated.
  • A form of rusticated masonry which is so wrought as to appear thickly indented with worm-tracks.
This word ultimately comes from the Latin 'vermis,' worm.
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