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Extinct Marsupial Preyed On Animals Bigger Than Itself

Extinct Marsupial Preyed On Animals Bigger Than Itself

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The biggest known carnivorous marsupial of the modern era – the Tasmanian tiger - or thylacine - went extinct in the early 20th century. Now, researchers have found that a distant,...

Latest Marsupial Stories

2013-10-17 23:26:39

An article featured in the Journal of Mammalogy reports on a new species of the marsupial, Caenolestes sangay, which was discovered in the Sangay National Park. Lawrence, Kansas (PRWEB) October 17, 2013 Journal of Mammalogy – Until recently, only 4 species of shrew-opossum were known to inhabit the northern Andes in South America. But on the eastern slopes of the Andes in Sangay National Park, a new species of the marsupial, Caenolestes sangay, was discovered. The authors of the article...

Ancient Sabre-Like Toothed Predator Had Weaker Bite Than Domestic Cat
2013-07-02 10:13:13

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Millions of years ago, a bizarre, pouched super-predator terrorized South America with huge saber-like teeth. New research from the University of New South Wales (UNSW), however, shows the Thylacosmilus atrox had a bite weaker than that of a domestic cat. Marsupials in Australia and America are among the closest living relatives of the extinct T. atrox, which had tooth roots extending rearwards almost into its small braincase....

2013-06-13 12:37:03

Tooth enamel reveals diet, habitats of extinct marsupials in southeastern Queensland The teeth of a kangaroo and other extinct marsupials reveal that southeastern Queensland 2.5-5-million-years ago was a mosaic of tropical forests, wetlands and grasslands and much less arid than previously thought. The chemical analysis of tooth enamel that suggests this diverse prehistoric habitat is published June 12 in the open access journal PLOS ONE by Shaena Montanari from the American Museum of...

2013-03-13 15:52:17

When, how and why modern humans first stood up and walked on two legs is considered to be one of the greatest missing links in our evolutionary history. Scientists have gone to the far ends of the earth — and the wonderful creatures in it - to look for answers to why we walk the way we walk. In the latest such search, researchers from the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg (South Africa) have taken a closer look at bipedal kangaroos and wallabies and how they move...

Marsupials Handedness Depends On Gender
2013-03-06 10:50:43

BioMed Central Boys are right-handed, girls are left...Well at least this is true for sugar gliders (Petaurus breviceps) and grey short-tailed opossums (Monodelphis domestica), finds an article in BioMed Central's open access journal BMC Evolutionary Biology, and shows that handedness in marsupials is dependent on gender. This preference of one hand over another has developed despite the absence of a corpus collosum, the part of the brain which in placental mammals allows one half of the...

Tasmanian Tiger Extinct Because Of Humans, Not Disease
2013-02-01 09:55:41

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study led by researchers at the University of Adelaide concludes that humans alone may have been responsible for the extinction of Australia's iconic native predator, the Tasmanian Tiger (thylacine). The study, published in a recent issue of the Journal of Animal Ecology, used a new population modeling approach to contradict the widespread belief that disease must have been a factor in the thylacine's extinction. The Tasmanian...

Paleontological Enigma Solved Thanks To Scrappy Grave Digger
2012-11-20 12:39:41

Michael Harper for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online There´s a popular cartoon geared towards adults which tells the story of a hapless young man who accidentally stumbles into a cryogenic capsule just moments before the turn of the century. The capsule just so happens to be set for 1,000 years, long enough for a couple of alien and robot uprisings and for the entire world our character knew to be virtually wiped away. The rest of the show is centered on how this 20th century...

Lack Of Genetic Diversity Put The Tasmanian Tiger In Danger
2012-04-19 10:26:38

While the Tasmanian tiger was being driven to extinction in the early 20th century by territorial interlopers and government bounties, the population of the bizarre marsupial also suffered from an extreme lack of genetic diversity, according to a study published this week in PLoS ONE. The Tasmanian tiger, also known as the thylacine, was as large as a medium-sized dog that roamed across both Australia and Tasmania and had no natural predators.  It was one of only two marsupials, along...

Saber-toothed Fossil Sheds New Light On Ancient Mammals
2011-11-03 06:58:59

A remarkable 94-million-year-old fossil found in South America is shedding new light on the ancient history of mammals. The specimen, dubbed Cronopio dentiacutus, is one of the very few mammal fossils to come out of South America from the era when dinosaurs ruled the Earth.    The mouse-sized creature had a long snout, dagger-like canines and a powerful set of muscles it used to chew its insect food. The mammal is a dryolestoid, an extinct group of animals distantly...

science-082511-001
2011-08-25 11:05:58

  A well-preserved fossil discovered in China provides new evidence that the split between placental mammals and marsupials may have occurred 35 million years earlier than previously believed, according to a new study published Wednesday in the journal Nature. The scientists, led by Carnegie Museum of Natural History paleontologist Zhe-Xi Luo, said the discovery fills an important gap in the fossil record, and helps to calibrate modern, DNA-based methods of dating evolution. The...


Latest Marsupial Reference Libraries

Andean White Eared Possum, Didelphis pernigra
2013-09-27 10:41:06

The Andean white-eared possum (Didelphis pernigra) is a species of marsupial that is native to South America. Its range extends from Bolivia to Venezuela through the Andes Mountains. It is thought to prefer a habitat in secondary forests and agricultural areas. There is not much known about the habits of the species, but it is thought to be in danger of crossbreeding in some areas of its range, although there are no major threats to the species as a whole. It occurs in many protected areas...

Common Brushtail Possum, Trichosurus vulpecula
2013-09-23 13:56:03

The common brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula) is a species of marsupial that is classified within the Phalangeridae family. It can be found in Australia in a range that extends from northern, eastern, several eastern areas of Australia, Tasmania, and a number of islands like Barrow Island and Kangaroo Island. This species was introduced into New Zealand in 1840, where it has now become an abundant species. It prefers to reside in a variety of habitats including semiarid areas, forests,...

Plush Coated Ringtail Possum, Pseudochirops corinnae
2013-08-26 11:21:12

The plush-coated ringtail possum (Pseudochirops corinnae), also known as the golden ringtail possum, is a marsupial that can be found in Papua New Guinea and Indonesia. It prefers a habitat within tropical and subtropical arid forests at elevations of up to 9,514 feet. This species is not well understood, but it has been found to be docile and approachable, and females are often seen with one young. It occurs in large numbers across it range, but it is rare to encounter. The major threat to...

Crest-tailed Mulgara, Dasycercus cristicauda
2013-08-23 11:37:56

The crest-tailed mulgara (Dasycercus cristicauda), also known as the ampurta, is a species of marsupial that is native to Australia, where it is thought to reside in a limited range between the Northern Territory and South Australia. It has been found to prefer a habitat within sandy areas that predominately hold Sandhill Canegrass. It is sometimes known as the crest-tailed marsupial mouse, due to its slight resemblance to a rat. Little is known about the habits of this species, but its...

Sulawesi Bear Cuscus, Ailurops ursinus
2013-08-21 14:19:04

The Sulawesi bear cuscus (Ailurops ursinus), also known as the Sulawesi bear phalanger, is marsupial that is classified within the Phalangeridae family. It can be found in Sulawesi, Indonesia, and neighboring islands. It prefers a habitat within tropical or subtropical arid or moist forests, at elevations of up to 1,968 feet above sea level. The Sulawesi bear cuscus is an arboreal animal, preferring to reside in the trees, and can typically be found in pairs. It is active during the day and...

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