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Latest Marsupial Stories

Grazing Red Kangaroos Use Their Tail As An Extra Leg
2014-07-02 10:22:22

Gerard LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online According to a new multi-institutional study of red kangaroos, it has been found that when grazing on all fours, these marsupials use their tail as an extra leg. While grazing, the tail helps with movement by pushing the kangaroo forward as it walks. The study, published online in Biology Letters, was co-authored by Associate Professor Maxwell Donelan from the Simon Fraser University, and Associate Professor Rodger Kram from...

Forelimb Bones Predicts Predator Style
2014-06-30 03:56:27

By David Orenstein, Brown University At the start of their research, paleobiologists Christine Janis and Borja Figueirido simply wanted to determine the hunting style of an extinct marsupial called Thylacine (also known as the "marsupial wolf" or the "Tasmanian tiger"). In the end, the Australian relic, which has a very dog-like head but with both cat- and dog-like features in the skeleton, proved to be uniquely unspecialized, but what emerged from the effort is a new classification system...

palate of the small sparassodont from Bolivia
2014-05-09 07:12:07

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Researchers at Case Western Reserve University have discovered an extinct, kitten-sized species believed to have lived in Bolivia some 13 million years ago, according to research appearing in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. According to third-year undergraduate student and evolutionary biology major Russell Engelman, the currently unnamed animal (UF 27881) would have been “about the size of a marten, a catlike weasel...

2014-05-08 08:56:02

As a fresh wave of extinctions sweeps through the ranks of Australian native animals, scientists are deploying their most powerful weapon yet in the struggle to understand and head off the wipe-out. Progress in developing the first nationwide database of Australian mammal observations, and understanding what is driving the dramatic rate of disappearances, will be reported to a national conference in Canberra today. With a hundred marsupial species at risk of extinction across the...

Mid Miocene Nimbacinus dicksoni
2014-04-10 12:28:55

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The biggest known carnivorous marsupial of the modern era – the Tasmanian tiger - or thylacine - went extinct in the early 20th century. Now, researchers have found that a distant, ancient relative of the thylacine was able to hunt down prey larger than itself, according to a new study in the open-access journal PLOS ONE. Based solely on a recovered 16- to 11.5-million-year-old skull, the study team was able to create a virtual...

2013-10-17 23:26:39

An article featured in the Journal of Mammalogy reports on a new species of the marsupial, Caenolestes sangay, which was discovered in the Sangay National Park. Lawrence, Kansas (PRWEB) October 17, 2013 Journal of Mammalogy – Until recently, only 4 species of shrew-opossum were known to inhabit the northern Andes in South America. But on the eastern slopes of the Andes in Sangay National Park, a new species of the marsupial, Caenolestes sangay, was discovered. The authors of the article...

Ancient Sabre-Like Toothed Predator Had Weaker Bite Than Domestic Cat
2013-07-02 10:13:13

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Millions of years ago, a bizarre, pouched super-predator terrorized South America with huge saber-like teeth. New research from the University of New South Wales (UNSW), however, shows the Thylacosmilus atrox had a bite weaker than that of a domestic cat. Marsupials in Australia and America are among the closest living relatives of the extinct T. atrox, which had tooth roots extending rearwards almost into its small braincase....

2013-06-13 12:37:03

Tooth enamel reveals diet, habitats of extinct marsupials in southeastern Queensland The teeth of a kangaroo and other extinct marsupials reveal that southeastern Queensland 2.5-5-million-years ago was a mosaic of tropical forests, wetlands and grasslands and much less arid than previously thought. The chemical analysis of tooth enamel that suggests this diverse prehistoric habitat is published June 12 in the open access journal PLOS ONE by Shaena Montanari from the American Museum of...

2013-03-13 15:52:17

When, how and why modern humans first stood up and walked on two legs is considered to be one of the greatest missing links in our evolutionary history. Scientists have gone to the far ends of the earth — and the wonderful creatures in it - to look for answers to why we walk the way we walk. In the latest such search, researchers from the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg (South Africa) have taken a closer look at bipedal kangaroos and wallabies and how they move...

Marsupials Handedness Depends On Gender
2013-03-06 10:50:43

BioMed Central Boys are right-handed, girls are left...Well at least this is true for sugar gliders (Petaurus breviceps) and grey short-tailed opossums (Monodelphis domestica), finds an article in BioMed Central's open access journal BMC Evolutionary Biology, and shows that handedness in marsupials is dependent on gender. This preference of one hand over another has developed despite the absence of a corpus collosum, the part of the brain which in placental mammals allows one half of the...


Latest Marsupial Reference Libraries

Numbat, Myrmecobius fasciatus
2014-05-24 17:24:24

The numbat (Myrmecobius fasciatus), also known as the marsupial anteater, banded anteater, or the walpurti, is a marsupial that can be found in Western Australia. This species once held a large range but it is now fragmented and limited to only a few small spots in Australia. It once resided in many habitats, but now it can only be found in eucalypt forests. Europeans first discovered this species in 1831, when Robert Dale led an expedition through the Avon Valley. George Robert Waterhouse...

Eastern Quoll, Dasyurus viverrinus
2014-05-19 12:50:49

The eastern quoll (Dasyurus viverrinus), or the eastern native cat, is a species of marsupial that is native to Australia. Its range once included mainland Australia, but it is still common on Tasmania. This species is one of six living quoll species and was named for its ferret-like appearance. George Shaw, who classified it with possums in the Didelphis genus, first discovered it in 1800. Male eastern quolls reach an average body length of 23.6 inches and weight of 2.8 pounds. This...

Southern Marsupial Mole, Notoryctes typhlops
2014-04-30 10:58:40

The southern marsupial mole (Notoryctes typhlops) is a species of marsupial that can be found in southwest Australia. It has been recorded in desert habitats with soft sand and spinifex grasses, but the habitat preferences of this species is currently unknown. Its range is thought to include northern areas of South Australia and the Northern Territory, as well as the Gibson and Great Victoria deserts. Although this species is a marsupial, it has been classified within its own order, known as...

Andean White Eared Possum, Didelphis pernigra
2013-09-27 10:41:06

The Andean white-eared possum (Didelphis pernigra) is a species of marsupial that is native to South America. Its range extends from Bolivia to Venezuela through the Andes Mountains. It is thought to prefer a habitat in secondary forests and agricultural areas. There is not much known about the habits of the species, but it is thought to be in danger of crossbreeding in some areas of its range, although there are no major threats to the species as a whole. It occurs in many protected areas...

Common Brushtail Possum, Trichosurus vulpecula
2013-09-23 13:56:03

The common brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula) is a species of marsupial that is classified within the Phalangeridae family. It can be found in Australia in a range that extends from northern, eastern, several eastern areas of Australia, Tasmania, and a number of islands like Barrow Island and Kangaroo Island. This species was introduced into New Zealand in 1840, where it has now become an abundant species. It prefers to reside in a variety of habitats including semiarid areas, forests,...

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Word of the Day
caparison
  • A cloth or covering, more or less ornamented, laid over the saddle or furniture of a horse, especially of a sumpter-horse or horse of state.
  • Clothing, especially sumptuous clothing; equipment; outfit.
  • To cover with a caparison, as a horse.
  • To dress sumptuously; adorn with rich dress.
This word ultimately comes from the Medieval Latin 'cappa,' cloak.
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