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Latest Marsupial Stories

Tasmanian Tiger Extinct Because Of Humans, Not Disease
2013-02-01 09:55:41

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study led by researchers at the University of Adelaide concludes that humans alone may have been responsible for the extinction of Australia's iconic native predator, the Tasmanian Tiger (thylacine). The study, published in a recent issue of the Journal of Animal Ecology, used a new population modeling approach to contradict the widespread belief that disease must have been a factor in the thylacine's extinction. The Tasmanian...

Paleontological Enigma Solved Thanks To Scrappy Grave Digger
2012-11-20 12:39:41

Michael Harper for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online There´s a popular cartoon geared towards adults which tells the story of a hapless young man who accidentally stumbles into a cryogenic capsule just moments before the turn of the century. The capsule just so happens to be set for 1,000 years, long enough for a couple of alien and robot uprisings and for the entire world our character knew to be virtually wiped away. The rest of the show is centered on how this 20th century...

Lack Of Genetic Diversity Put The Tasmanian Tiger In Danger
2012-04-19 10:26:38

While the Tasmanian tiger was being driven to extinction in the early 20th century by territorial interlopers and government bounties, the population of the bizarre marsupial also suffered from an extreme lack of genetic diversity, according to a study published this week in PLoS ONE. The Tasmanian tiger, also known as the thylacine, was as large as a medium-sized dog that roamed across both Australia and Tasmania and had no natural predators.  It was one of only two marsupials, along...

Saber-toothed Fossil Sheds New Light On Ancient Mammals
2011-11-03 06:58:59

A remarkable 94-million-year-old fossil found in South America is shedding new light on the ancient history of mammals. The specimen, dubbed Cronopio dentiacutus, is one of the very few mammal fossils to come out of South America from the era when dinosaurs ruled the Earth.    The mouse-sized creature had a long snout, dagger-like canines and a powerful set of muscles it used to chew its insect food. The mammal is a dryolestoid, an extinct group of animals distantly...

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2011-08-25 11:05:58

  A well-preserved fossil discovered in China provides new evidence that the split between placental mammals and marsupials may have occurred 35 million years earlier than previously believed, according to a new study published Wednesday in the journal Nature. The scientists, led by Carnegie Museum of Natural History paleontologist Zhe-Xi Luo, said the discovery fills an important gap in the fossil record, and helps to calibrate modern, DNA-based methods of dating evolution. The...

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2011-08-21 14:54:24

While sequencing the DNA of a member of the kangaroo family for the first time, an international team of researchers believe they have identified the gene responsible for the creature's hop, Judith Burns of BBC News reported on Friday. The project, which is detailed in the latest issue of the journal Genome Biology, centers around the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii), a smaller species of kangaroo located on islands off the south and west coasts of Australia. According to Burns, this...

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2011-07-06 12:55:00

Scientists said Wednesday that the fossil of a mega-wombat has been unearthed in northern Australia. The herbivorous diprotodon was the largest marsupial to ever roam the earth and lived between two million and 50,000 years ago. The diprotodon skeleton was dug up in remote Queensland last week and scientists believe it could shed valuable light on the species' demise. The ancient marsupial became extinct around the same time that indigenous tribes first appeared and debate has raged about...

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2010-12-10 10:25:48

Contrary to the recently established theory that marsupials have excellent color vision, research has shown that the wallaby is a rare exception. The research team, led by Dr Jan Hemmi from the ARC Centre of Excellence in Vision Science and The Australian National University, has shown that Tammar wallabies are much weaker in discriminating different colors because they are missing one type of visual pigment cell. "Dr Ebeling has demonstrated that wallabies do not have the complete set of...

2010-11-30 21:19:26

Long a staple of nature documentaries, the somewhat bizarre development of a grub-like pink marsupial embryo outside the mother's womb is curious in another way. Duke University researchers have found that the developmental program executed by the marsupial embryo runs in a different order than the program executed by virtually every other vertebrate animal. "The limbs are at a different place in the entire timeline," said Anna Keyte, a postdoctoral biology researcher at Duke who did this...

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2010-11-03 11:57:48

Surprising first ancestor of bizarre marsupial moles The mysterious origins of Australia's bizarre and secretive marsupial moles have been cast in a whole new and unexpected light with the first discovery in the fossil record of one of their ancestors. The find reveals a remarkable journey through time, place and lifestyle: living marsupial moles are blind, earless and live underground in the deserts of the Northern Territory, Western Australia and South Australia, yet their ancestors lived...


Latest Marsupial Reference Libraries

Numbat, Myrmecobius fasciatus
2014-05-24 17:24:24

The numbat (Myrmecobius fasciatus), also known as the marsupial anteater, banded anteater, or the walpurti, is a marsupial that can be found in Western Australia. This species once held a large range but it is now fragmented and limited to only a few small spots in Australia. It once resided in many habitats, but now it can only be found in eucalypt forests. Europeans first discovered this species in 1831, when Robert Dale led an expedition through the Avon Valley. George Robert Waterhouse...

Eastern Quoll, Dasyurus viverrinus
2014-05-19 12:50:49

The eastern quoll (Dasyurus viverrinus), or the eastern native cat, is a species of marsupial that is native to Australia. Its range once included mainland Australia, but it is still common on Tasmania. This species is one of six living quoll species and was named for its ferret-like appearance. George Shaw, who classified it with possums in the Didelphis genus, first discovered it in 1800. Male eastern quolls reach an average body length of 23.6 inches and weight of 2.8 pounds. This...

Southern Marsupial Mole, Notoryctes typhlops
2014-04-30 10:58:40

The southern marsupial mole (Notoryctes typhlops) is a species of marsupial that can be found in southwest Australia. It has been recorded in desert habitats with soft sand and spinifex grasses, but the habitat preferences of this species is currently unknown. Its range is thought to include northern areas of South Australia and the Northern Territory, as well as the Gibson and Great Victoria deserts. Although this species is a marsupial, it has been classified within its own order, known as...

Andean White Eared Possum, Didelphis pernigra
2013-09-27 10:41:06

The Andean white-eared possum (Didelphis pernigra) is a species of marsupial that is native to South America. Its range extends from Bolivia to Venezuela through the Andes Mountains. It is thought to prefer a habitat in secondary forests and agricultural areas. There is not much known about the habits of the species, but it is thought to be in danger of crossbreeding in some areas of its range, although there are no major threats to the species as a whole. It occurs in many protected areas...

Common Brushtail Possum, Trichosurus vulpecula
2013-09-23 13:56:03

The common brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula) is a species of marsupial that is classified within the Phalangeridae family. It can be found in Australia in a range that extends from northern, eastern, several eastern areas of Australia, Tasmania, and a number of islands like Barrow Island and Kangaroo Island. This species was introduced into New Zealand in 1840, where it has now become an abundant species. It prefers to reside in a variety of habitats including semiarid areas, forests,...

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Word of the Day
mallemaroking
  • Nautical, the visiting and carousing of sailors in the Greenland ships.
This word is apparently from a confusion of two similar Dutch words: 'mallemerok,' a foolish woman, and 'mallemok,' a name for some persons among the crew of a whaling vessel.