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Latest Martin J. Blaser Stories

Disrupting Microbes In Gut Early In Life Can Lead To Obesity In Adulthood
2014-08-18 03:06:38

Cell Press Certain microbes found in the gut may protect against obesity and diabetes. A study published by Cell Press August 14th in the journal Cell reveals that these microbes shape their hosts' metabolism very early in life and that disrupting them with short-term exposure to antibiotics during infancy can cause metabolic changes that appear to increase the risk of obesity in adulthood. These findings in mice are helping researchers identify which gut bacteria are crucial to metabolic...

2013-04-19 17:41:19

Numerous epidemiologic studies have shown that a diet high in salt is associated with an increased risk of gastric cancer. Now Timothy L. Cover and colleagues of Vanderbilt University show that high dietary salt combined with infection by the ulcer-causing bacterium Helicobacter pylori greatly increases the risk of cancer. The study was published ahead of print in the journal Infection and Immunity. In the study, the researchers infected Mongolian gerbils with H. pylori. One set of gerbils...

Fighting Obesity With Gut Bacteria
2013-02-10 05:58:43

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online The same stomach microbe that experts believe is responsible for ulcers, gastric cancer, and other health issues could also help control a person´s body weight and glucose tolerance, researchers from the Virginia Bioinformatics Institute of Virginia Tech report in a recently-published study. Helicobacter pylori, a microaerophilic bacterium found in the stomach, has been linked to the development of duodenal ulcers and stomach...

2013-01-09 12:43:25

H. pylori isn't a major cause of death and may protect against stroke and some cancers A new study by NYU School of Medicine researchers reveals that an especially virulent strain of the gut bacterium Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) isn't implicated in the overall death rate of the U.S. population, and may even protect against stroke and some cancers. The findings, based a nationwide health survey of nearly 10,000 individuals over a period of some 12 years, are published online, January 9,...

2012-08-21 22:45:22

Treating very young infants with antibiotics may predispose them to being overweight in childhood, according to a study of more than 10,000 children by researchers at the NYU School of Medicine and the NYU Wagner School of Public Service and published in the online August 21, 2012, issue of the International Journal of Obesity. The study found that on average, children exposed to antibiotics from birth to 5 months of age weighed more for their height than children who weren't exposed....

2012-03-14 22:17:20

A new study by researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center reveals that the presence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) bacteria is associated with elevated levels of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), an important biomarker for blood glucose levels and diabetes. The association was even stronger in obese individuals with a higher Body Mass Index (BMI). The results, which suggest the bacteria may play a role in the development of diabetes in adults, are available online in The Journal of...

2012-03-14 13:42:44

A recent study shows that the presence of H. pylori bacteria is associated with elevated levels of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), an important biomarker for blood glucose levels and diabetes. This association was stronger in obese individuals with a higher Body Mass Index (BMI). The results, which suggest the bacteria may play a role in the development of diabetes in adults, are published in The Journal of Infectious Diseases and are now available online. H. pylori infection of the...

2011-10-21 13:49:25

In the October 20th edition of the journal Cell Host and Microbe, Drs. Claudia Plottel and Martin J. Blaser of the Departments of Medicine and Microbiology at NYU Langone Medical Center, and the Department of Biology at New York University, present a model for understanding how cancer evolves in humans based on an understanding of the bacteria living in our body, the microbiome. The authors suggest that the bacteria that reside in us play a crucial role in maintaining our health. This...

2011-08-24 21:45:35

Researcher urges immediate investigation of widespread antibiotic use and overuse In the zeal to eliminate dangerous bacteria, it is possible that we are also permanently killing off beneficial bacteria as well, posits Martin Blaser, MD, Frederick H. King Professor of Medicine, professor of Microbiology and chair of the Department of Medicine at NYU Langone Medical Center. His commentary is published in the August 25 edition of the journal Nature. Dr. Blaser sounded the alarm to the...


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