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Latest Martin Sander Stories

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2010-05-11 11:17:36

Scientists explain why the long neck dinosaurs were able to reach such gigantic proportions There is a simple rule of thumb. The larger an animal is, the more time it spends eating. This means an elephant hardly has time to sleep. It spends 18 hours every day satisfying its huge appetite. 'This led us to one of the many riddles that gigantism of dinosaurs puts before us,' Professor Martin Sander from the University of Bonn explains. 'They were just so large that a day would have had to have...

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2010-05-03 09:35:52

In 1895, the sister of an eccentric paleontologist called Franz Baron Nopcsa discovered small dinosaur bones on their family estate in Transylvania. Nopcsa interpreted these as the remains of dwarfed animals that had once lived on an island. Among these finds were a number of bones belonging to a sauropod dinosaur which Nopcsa named Magyarosaurus dacus, after his native country. A team of scientists led by Koen Stein and Professor Dr. Martin Sander from the University of Bonn, decided to cut...

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2008-02-06 10:15:00

Scientists from the University of Bonn are researching which plants giant dinosaurs could have lived off more than 100 million years ago. They want to find out how the dinosaurs were able to become as large as they did. In actual fact such gigantic animals should not have existed. The results of the research have now been published in the journal 'Proceedings of the Royal Society B'.Take 200 milligrams of dried and ground equisetum, ten milliliters of digestive juice from sheep's rumen, a few...

2006-06-07 12:05:00

By Patricia Reaney LONDON (Reuters) - Fossils from a new species of a 150 million-year-old dwarf dinosaur have been found in northern Germany, scientists said on Wednesday. Initially they suspected that the remains from more than 11 sauropods were from young dinosaurs. But an analysis of their bones showed they were small adults that probably lived on an island during the late Jurassic period. "It is the first case of island dwarfing proven for sauropod dinosaurs," said Professor Martin...

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2005-12-22 08:00:07

NASA -- Palaeontologists from the University of Bonn report on an intriguing diagnosis in the 16 December issue of the journal Science. A dinosaur which they have examined was apparently able to vary the speed of its growth according the conditions obtaining in its environment. Although tortoises and crocodiles also do this, plateosaurus engelhardti seems to be unique among dinosaurs, leading experts to puzzle over whether the family history of the dinosaurs will need to be rewritten....


Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
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