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Latest Mary Stories

2012-05-29 12:38:58

Research finds 20 distinct mutations A rare disease which often first presents in newborn babies has been traced to a novel genetic defect, scientists at Queen Mary, University of London have found. The research, published online in Nature Genetics (27 May) discovered 20 distinct mutations in a specific gene found in patients with the rare adrenal disease, Familial Glucocorticoid Deficiency (FGD). The potentially fatal disease means affected children are unable to produce a hormone...

2012-05-09 14:36:09

Tiny organelles called primary cilia hold the key to combat inflammation Scientists from Queen Mary, University of London have found a new therapeutic target to combat inflammation. The research, published in the journal Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences, revealed tiny organelles called primary cilia are important for regulating inflammation. The findings could lead to potential therapies for millions of people who suffer from arthritis. Dr Martin Knight who led the research at...

Newborns Should Be Screened For Heart Defects
2012-05-02 06:39:55

There is now overwhelming evidence that all babies should be offered screening for heart defects at birth, according to a major new study published online in The Lancet. Heart defects are the most common type of birth defects in the UK. Although newborns often show no visible signs of the condition, if not treated promptly it can be fatal. The research, led by a Queen Mary, University of London academic with a colleague from the University of Birmingham, shows that a non-invasive test...

2012-04-10 10:43:28

A new study from researchers at Queen Mary, University of London reveals the many difficulties faced by people with diabetes in self-managing their disease. People with diabetes have to invest a great deal of time and effort to manage their condition. This includes not only monitoring the level of sugar in their blood, organizing their medication and following a restrictive diet but also social challenges such as negotiating relatives' input and gaining access to doctors when they need to....

2012-03-27 20:33:48

Mechanism which causes normal cells to develop into cancer has been uncovered by Queen Mary scientists Research from Queen Mary, University of London has uncovered the mechanism which causes normal cells to develop into cancer, giving hope in the fight against one of the UK's biggest killers. The study, published in the online journal PLoS ONE today (26 March), investigated the role of the notorious cancer gene FOXM1. Lead investigator Dr Muy-Teck Teh from Queen Mary, University of...

2012-03-26 14:34:14

Researchers at Queen Mary, University of London have identified a new protein that makes pancreatic cancer cells less 'sticky' and therefore less able to attach to and invade other tissue. The protein, known as S100PBP, does this by suppressing a second protein called cathepsin Z. The research team has shown that cathepsin Z makes pancreatic cancer cells sticky, allowing them to spread to their surrounding environment. Prior to this study nothing was known about the function of S100PBP in...

2012-03-12 11:18:18

Scientists discover protein and move a step closer to preventing cardiovascular disease Researchers from Queen Mary, University of London and the University of Surrey have found a protein inside blood vessels with an ability to protect the body from substances which cause cardiovascular disease. The findings, published online in the journal Cardiovascular Research, have revealed the protein pregnane X receptor (PXR) can switch on different protective pathways in the blood vessels....


Word of the Day
barratry
  • The offense of persistently instigating lawsuits, typically groundless ones.
  • An unlawful breach of duty on the part of a ship's master or crew resulting in injury to the ship's owner.
  • Sale or purchase of positions in church or state.
This word ultimately comes from the Old French word 'barater,' to cheat.
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