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Latest Mary Stories

2012-01-20 12:28:35

A new insight into the impact that warmer temperatures could have across the world has been uncovered by scientists at Queen Mary, University of London. The research, published in the journal Global Change Biology today (20 January), found that the impact of global warming could be similar across ecosystems, regardless of local environmental conditions and species. The team, based at Queen Mary's School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, went to Iceland to study a set of...

2012-01-20 10:57:08

A new insight into the impact that warmer temperatures could have across the world has been uncovered by scientists at Queen Mary, University of London. The research, published in the journal Global Change Biology today (20 January), found that the impact of global warming could be similar across ecosystems, regardless of local environmental conditions and species. The team, based at Queen Mary's School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, went to Iceland to study a set of...

2012-01-19 17:19:24

New research from Queen Mary, University of London has uncovered a gene which plays a key role in the development of oesophageal cancer (cancer of the gullet). The researchers studied families who suffer a rare inherited condition making them highly susceptible to the disease and found that a fault in a single gene was responsible. Initial studies suggest that the gene could play a role in the more common, non-inherited form of the disease, revealing a new target for treating this...

2012-01-17 11:01:35

A devastating neurodegenerative disease that first appears in toddlers just as they are beginning to walk has been traced to defects in mitochondria, the 'batteries' or energy-producing power plants of cells. This finding by researchers at Queen Mary, University of London and Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital - The Neuro - at McGill University, is published in this week's issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA. The disorder, Autosomal...

2012-01-11 11:55:56

Research from Queen Mary, University of London suggests that omega-3 fatty acids, which are found in fish oil, have the potential to protect nerves from injury and help them to regenerate. When nerves are damaged because of an accident or injury, patients experience pain, weakness and muscle paralysis which can leave them disabled, and recovery rates are poor. The new study, published this week in the Journal of Neuroscience, suggests that omega-3 fatty acids could play a significant...

2012-01-05 14:36:20

A new study from researchers at Queen Mary, University of London shows how a particular virus tricks the immune system into triggering inflammation and nerve cell damage in the brain, which is known to cause MS. Previous research has suggested a link between the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and multiple sclerosis but the research has remained controversial since scientists have so far failed to substantiate the link. The new study proves the virus is involved in a manner more sophisticated...

2011-12-14 10:20:27

More than one baby in every 50 is born with a birth defect (congenital anomaly) according to the latest annual report by the British Isles Network of Congenital Anomaly Registers (BINOCAR) — significantly more common than previously reported estimates of around one in 80. The study — led by researchers at Queen Mary, University of London and commissioned by the Healthcare Quality Improvement Partnership (HQIP) — is the most up-to-date and comprehensive of its kind,...

2011-12-07 22:10:53

New research by psychologists at Queen Mary, University of London has revealed that the way we see the world might depend on reflexes in the brain. Writing in the Journal of Vision, Dr Michael Proulx from Queen Mary's School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, and former student Monique Green, explain how an optical illusion known as the Müller-Lyer Illusion captures our attention more strongly than other visual tests, suggesting that the brain calculates size as a reflex...

2011-11-29 16:52:54

New research from Queen Mary, University of London suggests that many cases of diabetes could be prevented by making use of existing prediction tools. The study, published today in the British Medical Journal, shows that there are dozens of different techniques for predicting with reasonable accuracy who will develop diabetes but almost none are currently being used. The researchers say that if these tools were used by GPs and members of the public, many cases of diabetes could be...


Word of the Day
grass-comber
  • A landsman who is making his first voyage at sea; a novice who enters naval service from rural life.
According to the OED, a grass-comber is also 'a sailor's term for one who has been a farm-labourer.'