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Latest Mating Stories

2012-05-03 18:49:35

At one University of Cincinnati laboratory, the phrase “battle of the sexes” is taking on new meaning, with implications for our understanding of evolution. In a paper published Thursday, May 3, in the journal Evolution, University of Cincinnati graduate student Karl Grieshop and Michal Polak, associate professor of biological sciences at UC, examine the role of genital spines in the reproductive success of a species of fruit fly. Their investigation identifies the specific...

2012-05-03 18:46:09

Study is first to find possible causative link but biological reasons are unknown For the first time, scientists have found what could be a causative link between the concentration of circulating Y-chromosome fetal cells in women who gave birth to children of either sex and their risk of later developing breast cancer and colon cancer. The findings show that the presence of fetal cells is a double-edged sword: Women with the lowest concentration of fetal cells were 70 percent less likely...

Biologists Turn Back The Clock To Understand Evolution Of Sex Differences
2012-05-03 12:44:23

Battles of sexes shown to spur adaptive sex differences Sex differences account for some of the most of the spectacular traits in nature: the wild colors of male guppies, the plumage of peacocks, tusks on walruses and antlers on moose. Sexual conflict — the battle between males and females over mating — is thought to be a particularly potent force in driving the evolution traits that differ in males and females. However, the genetic processes responsible for producing such...

2012-05-03 09:43:47

In most species, females prefer the most intense courtship display males can muster, but a new study finds that female cowbirds actually prefer less intense displays. The full results are published May 2 in the open access journal PLoS ONE. The researchers, led by Adrian O'Loghlen of University of California Santa Barbara, write that males direct more intense wing-spreading displays toward other males as aggressive communicative signals. It appears, however, that while these signals may...

2012-04-26 09:47:47

Male praying mantises are more likely to engage in risky mating behavior if they have not had recent access to females, as reported Apr. 25 in the open access journal PLoS ONE. Female praying mantises are known for their cannibalistic behavior toward their mates, and males take a large risk when they attempt to reproduce. In the current work, led by William Brown of State University of New York at Fredonia, the researchers found that males modulate this risk by altering their approach rate...

Discerning Males Remain Faithful
2012-04-25 04:50:54

Discerning males remain faithful...if you are a spider. Sex for male orb web spiders (Argiope bruennichi) is a two shot affair since the act of mating destroys their genitalia. If they survive being eaten during their first encounter with a female, they have two choices — to mate again with the same female (monogynous) or try to find a new partner (bigynous). New research published in BioMed Central's open access journal Frontiers in Zoology shows that choice of mating behavior for A....

2012-03-21 13:52:29

Males consistently change their mating behavior depending on whether they have spent time with other males before mating, according to new findings by scientists at the University of East Anglia (UEA). Publishing today in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the researchers studied how male Drosophila melanogaster - or fruit flies - change their mating behavior in response to their social environment. Previously, the UEA team had found that in a single mating, males exposed...

2012-03-09 08:00:00

Online Event: Rosalind Sedacca, CCT is one of seven author/experts providing advice for women re-entering the dating world at the upcoming Better Than Ever at Dating and Relationship Online Weekend Retreat. Co-author of 99 Things Women Wish They Knew Before Dating After 40, 50 & Yes, 60!, Sedacca and her therapist sister Amy Sherman, LMHC, are also creators of the DatingRescue 10-week eCourses for women of all ages and the Create Your Ideal Relationship Kit targeting women in mid-life....

2012-01-31 09:15:30

For those with few social advantages, college is a prime pathway to financial stability, but it also unexpectedly lowers their odds of ever marrying, according to a study by Cornell University sociologist Kelly Musick being published in the February issue of the Journal of Marriage and Family (available online: http://bit.ly/yt9uwJ). The findings suggest that social and cultural factors, not just income, are central to marriage decisions. Men and women from the least advantaged backgrounds...

Bonobos‘ Unusual Success Story
2012-01-24 04:00:24

Dominant males invest in friendly relationships with females Mate competition by males over females is common in many animal species. During mating season male testosterone levels rise, resulting in an increase in aggressive behavior and masculine features. Male bonobos, however, invest much more into friendly relationships with females. Elevated testosterone and aggression levels would collide with this increased tendency towards forming pair-relationships. Bonobos are among the...


Latest Mating Reference Libraries

Stegodyphus lineatus
2014-04-07 14:12:35

Stegodyphus lineatus is the only European species belonging to the spider genus Stegodyphus. The males of this species are up to 12 millimeters long, while the females are up to 15 millimeters long. The coloration can range from whitish to almost black. In the majority of individuals, the opisthosoma is whitish with two broad black longitudinal stripes. The males and females look similar, but the male is usually richer in contrast and has a bulbous forehead. The species name is in...

41_25d27d40c165b27bad3563db51760b0c
2007-02-21 11:04:54

The Greek Tortoise, Testudo graeca, is one of four European member of the Testudinidae family of tortoises. The other members of the family are Herman's Tortoise, Marginated Tortoise, and Horsfield's Tortoise. There are six noticeable differences between males and females of the Greek Tortoise. Males have a longer tail that tapers to an even point. The anal cavity opening is farther from the base of the tail on the male. The male's underbelly is somewhat curved, while females have a flat...

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