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Latest Mating Stories

The Secret Sex Life Of The Promiscuous Deep-Sea Squid
2011-09-21 09:55:59

   [ Watch the Video ] Researchers on an 18-year study of the Octopoteuthis deletron, a species of squid that is found at a depth of 1300 to 2600 feet in the Eastern Pacific Ocean, found that males mate as often with their own gender as they do with females, reports BBC News. By studying footage taken by submersible vehicles, researchers, led by Hendrik Hoving of the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) in Moss Landing, California, found that this rarely...

2011-09-07 14:03:28

For better or worse, marital quality influences the well-being of couples and those around them. In addition, economic and social hardships can reduce overall happiness within marriages. According to a new study from the University of Missouri, low-income couples who receive government assistance, such as Medicaid or Food Stamps, are significantly less satisfied and committed in their marriages. “We found that there´s a unique relationship among income level, government...

2011-09-02 12:15:50

Ultimate goal is to provide stability for children Child welfare professionals know that children are safer and healthier when the adults in their lives have healthy relationships, but most social workers are not trained to educate couples about strong relationships and marriages. Researchers at the University of Missouri are working to train child welfare professionals and future social workers to help individuals and families strengthen their relationships. Funded by the U.S....

2011-08-15 15:24:44

Think about how much you fight and argue with your spouse today.  A new study suggests that your current level of conflict probably won't change much for the remainder of your marriage. That may be good news for the 16 percent of couples who report little conflict or even the 60 percent who have only moderate levels of conflict.  But it's not such happy news for the 22 percent of couples who say they fight and argue with each other a lot. The study followed nearly 1,000 couples over...

2011-05-16 15:59:15

Aggressive male mating behavior might well be a successful reproductive strategy for the individual but it can drive the species to extinction, an international research team headed by evolutionary biologist Daniel Rankin from the University of Zurich has demonstrated in a mathematical model. Evolutionary biologists have long debated whether the behavior of the individual is able to influence processes on a population or species level. The possibility of selection at species level is still...

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2011-03-01 09:58:42

In the mating game, some female mites are mightier than their mates, new research at the University of Michigan and the Russian Academy of Sciences suggests. The evidence comes, in part, from 40 million-year-old mating mites preserved in Baltic amber. In a paper published March 1 in the Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, researchers Pavel Klimov and Ekaterina Sidorchuk describe an extinct mite species in which the traditional sex roles were reversed. "In this species, it is the female...

2011-01-24 18:23:29

The success of a fungal pathogen in becoming a persistent and opportunistic source of infection in human beings may be due to a mating strategy that can best be described as "don't be too choosy." A new Brown University study finds that Candida albicans will respond to the pheromones of several different species, not just its own, and if an opposite-sex partner isn't around, it can switch over to same-sex mating. In affairs of DNA exchange "” for the yeast has no heart "” Candida...

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2010-12-15 11:24:33

University of Guelph researchers have finally figured out why female squirrels are so darn promiscuous. Turns out it has nothing to do with genes and everything to do with how many males are knocking at their door. "Their behaviour is overwhelmingly influenced by opportunity," said graduate student Eryn McFarlane, who, along with integrative biology professor Andrew McAdam and a team of researchers from across Canada, solved a mystery that has baffled biologists for years. Their findings...

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2010-11-05 09:28:17

A new study published this week shows a genetic 'battle of the sexes' could be much harder to resolve and even more important to evolution than previously thought. This battle, observed across many species and known as intralocus sexual conflict, happens when the genes for a trait which is good for the breeding success of one sex are bad for the other "“ sparking an 'evolutionary tug-o-war' between the sexes. It has previously been thought these issues were only resolved when the trait...

2010-11-02 15:16:24

At least, in nematode worms Male worms plug females after copulation as a form of 'gift', rather than to prevent them from mating again, as had previously been thought. Researchers writing in BioMed Central's open access journal Frontiers in Zoology found that plugged females mated just as often and were just as attractive as those who were unplugged, and that plugging ultimately improved female fitness. Nadine Timmermeyer worked with a team of researchers from the University of Tuebingen,...


Latest Mating Reference Libraries

Stegodyphus lineatus
2014-04-07 14:12:35

Stegodyphus lineatus is the only European species belonging to the spider genus Stegodyphus. The males of this species are up to 12 millimeters long, while the females are up to 15 millimeters long. The coloration can range from whitish to almost black. In the majority of individuals, the opisthosoma is whitish with two broad black longitudinal stripes. The males and females look similar, but the male is usually richer in contrast and has a bulbous forehead. The species name is in...

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2007-02-21 11:04:54

The Greek Tortoise, Testudo graeca, is one of four European member of the Testudinidae family of tortoises. The other members of the family are Herman's Tortoise, Marginated Tortoise, and Horsfield's Tortoise. There are six noticeable differences between males and females of the Greek Tortoise. Males have a longer tail that tapers to an even point. The anal cavity opening is farther from the base of the tail on the male. The male's underbelly is somewhat curved, while females have a flat...

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Word of the Day
lunula
  • A small crescent-shaped structure or marking, especially the white area at the base of a fingernail that resembles a half-moon.
This word is a diminutive of the Latin 'luna,' moon.
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