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Latest Matthew Meselson Stories

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2008-05-29 17:54:06

MBL, WOODS HOLE, MA"”Where do you get your genes? If you are an animal, you inherit them from your parents at the moment of conception, and that's about it. No later incorporation of environmental DNA for you, unless you become host to a parasite or an endosymbiont that somehow transfers bits of its genome into yours (which is a rarely documented event). Unless you are a bdelloid rotifer, that is. This odd, microscopic, freshwater animal is making news once again, this time for the...

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2008-04-02 17:05:00

Birds and bees may do it, but the microscopic animals called bdelloid rotifers seem to get along just fine without sex, thank you. What's more, they have done so over millions of years of evolution, resulting in at least 370 species. These hardy creatures somehow escape the usual drawback of asexuality "“ extinction "“ and the Marine Biological Laboratory's (MBL) David Mark Welch, Matthew Meselson, and their colleagues are finding out how.In two related papers published this week...

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2008-03-25 15:40:00

Finding could stimulate new study of free radicals' role in inflammation, cancer, agingScientists at Harvard University have found that a common class of freshwater invertebrate animals called bdelloid rotifers are extraordinarily resistant to ionizing radiation, surviving and continuing to reproduce after doses of gamma radiation much greater than that tolerated by any other animal species studied to date.Because free radicals such as those generated by radiation have been implicated in...

2005-08-06 15:36:16

WOODS HOLE, MA - A January 2004 finding by biologists at the Josephine Bay Paul Center for Comparative Molecular Biology and Evolution added important evidence to the radical conclusion that a group of diminutive aquatic animals called bdelloid rotifers have evolved for tens of millions of years without sexual reproduction, in apparent violation of the rule that abandonment of sexual reproduction is a biological dead end. Now, MBL scientists are beginning to understand just what's different...


Word of the Day
holluschickie
  • A 'bachelor seal'; a young male seal which is prevented from mating by its herd's older males (mated bulls defending their territory).
This comes from the Russian word for 'bachelors.'
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