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Latest Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology Stories

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2010-12-22 14:25:00

Scientists have recovered the DNA code of a human relative discovered recently in Siberia, which found that the relative roamed far from the cave that holds its only known remains. Scientists found evidence that these "Denisovans" from over 30,000 years ago ranged all across Asia.  They apparently interbred with the ancestors of people that now live in Melanesia. There is no sign that Denisovans mingled with ancestors of people living in Eurasia, which made the connection between...

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2010-11-09 13:58:32

Whether cognitive differences exist between modern humans and Neanderthals is the subject of contentious disputes in anthropology and archaeology. Because the brain size range of modern humans and Neanderthals overlap, many researchers previously assumed that the cognitive capabilities of these two species were similar. Among humans, however, the internal organization of the brain is more important for cognitive abilities than its absolute size is. The brain's internal organization depends on...

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2010-09-01 11:20:18

High social status and maternal support play an important role in the mating success of male bonobos Success makes sexy - this does not only apply to human beings, but also to various animals. Male bonobos appear to benefit from this phenomenon as well. A team of researchers led by Gottfried Hohmann of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology has discovered that the higher up a male bonobo is placed in the social hierarchy, the greater his mating success is with female bonobos....

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2010-03-25 06:20:00

Genetic testing on a humanoid pinky finger bone discovered in a Siberian cave in 2008 has revealed the possible existence of a new, previously undiscovered pre-human life form, researchers announced on Wednesday. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, the University of Montana's Division of Biological Sciences, the University of Vienna's Department of Anthropology, and the Russian Academy of Sciences published their research online in the journal Nature on...

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2010-01-01 08:26:18

DNA that is left in the remains of long-dead plants, animals, or humans allows a direct look into the history of evolution. So far, studies of this kind on ancestral members of our own species have been hampered by scientists' inability to distinguish the ancient DNA from modern-day human DNA contamination. Now, research by Svante Pääbo from The Max-Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, published online on December 31st in Current Biology "” a Cell Press...

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2009-06-15 12:35:00

Scientists in the Netherlands have found part of a Neanderthal man's skull that has been dredged up from the North Sea, BBC News reported. The specimen is a fragment from the front of a skull belonging to a young adult male and experts say it is the first confirmed find of its kind. The 60,000-year-old fossil has undergone an extensive analysis of chemical "isotopes" that match results from other Neanderthal specimens, suggesting a carnivorous diet. This is the first confirmed specimen of...

2009-02-14 16:22:47

International researchers say they have completed a draft of the genetic blueprint of Neanderthals, humans' primitive cousin. The scientists say their discovery shows Neanderthals made very little, if any contribution to human genes, USA Today reported Saturday. Neanderthals occupied Europe from about 800,000 to 30,000 years ago, the newspaper noted. Team chief Svante Paabo of Germany's Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig said their findings provide a good overview...

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2009-02-12 11:40:00

Scientists said Thursday that they have mapped a first draft of the Neanderthal genome, which might reveal the links between modern humans and their prehistoric cousins. Researchers used DNA fragments extracted from three Croatian fossils to show over 60 percent of the entire Neanderthal genome and sequencing three billion bases of DNA. "The Neanderthal genome sequence will clarify the evolutionary relationship between humans and Neanderthals as well as help identify those genetic changes...

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2008-10-14 09:40:00

In a population survey of West African chimpanzees living in Côte d'Ivoire, researchers estimate that this endangered subspecies has dropped in numbers by a whopping 90 percent since the last survey was conducted 18 years ago. The few remaining chimpanzees are now highly fragmented, with only one viable population living in Taï National Park, according to a report in the October 14th issue of Current Biology, a Cell Press publication. This alarming...

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2008-02-12 14:10:00

'Face-to-face' a first for endangered apesScientists from the Wildlife Conservation Society and Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology have released the first known photographs of gorillas performing face-to-face copulation in the wild. This is the first time that western gorillas have been observed and photographed mating in such a manner.The photographs were part of a study conducted in a forest clearing in Nouabal©-Ndoki National Park in the Republic of Congo that appeared...


Word of the Day
mundungus
  • A stinking tobacco.
  • Offal; waste animal product; organic matter unfit for consumption.
This word comes from the Spanish 'mondongo,' tripe, entrails.