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Latest measles virus Stories

Reasons For Measles High-Contagiousness Pinpointed
2011-11-05 04:59:44

An international team of researchers say that they have discovered how and why the measles virus spreads so quickly -- respiratory secretions linked to a key receptor located in the trachea. In a Friday press release, officials with INSERM (Institut national de la santé et de la recherche médicale), who was involved with the work, report that this receptor, known as nectine-4, "allows the virus to spread through the air rapidly from one organism to another."...

2011-11-02 21:26:52

Mayo Clinic researchers have discovered why measles, perhaps the most contagious viral disease in the world, spreads so quickly. The virus emerges in the trachea of its host, provoking a cough that fills the air with particles ready to infect the next host. The findings may also help in the fight against ovarian, breast and lung cancers. The findings, published online Nov. 2 in the journal Nature, give researchers insight into why some respiratory viruses spread more quickly and easily...

2011-10-24 22:39:10

Professor Sarah Butcher's research group from Helsinki University's Institute of Biotechnology report in the 24th October online issue of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (U.S.A.) a three-dimensional model of measles virus. The new model helps to explain many previous, unaccounted for observations in the life cycle of the virus. Measles is an important disease worldwide that is highly infectious, causing the deaths of over 100000 people annually. According to the...

2011-08-26 11:02:28

PVRL4 (Nectin 4) is a receptor for measles virus Canadian researchers have discovered that a tumor cell marker is a receptor for measles virus, suggesting the possible use of measles virus to help fight cancer. Their findings appear in the Open Access journal PLoS Pathogens on August 25th. Viruses cause infection by attaching to specific proteins on cell surfaces called receptors. Dr. Chris Richardson of Dalhousie Medical School in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada and colleagues found that...

2011-02-28 22:20:43

New research that reveals how maternal antibodies block an immune response to the measles virus is a first step toward improving current childhood vaccination practices, scientists say. Maternal antibodies are passed to fetuses during pregnancy and to newborns in their mothers' milk. The antibodies protect infants against disease in the first months of life, but that protection comes at a cost: Their presence also interferes with the generation of a natural immune response to vaccination. As...

2011-01-20 21:58:00

Cells infected by measles virus pull out a heavy weapon in the form of the enzyme ADAR1 Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have found that a known enzyme in cells protects against measles virus, likely by altering the virus's genetic material, RNA. Cells lacking the enzyme become highly vulnerable to the virus's destructive effects. The enzyme also protects against several other respiratory viruses, including influenza A. "We believe that host cells use this RNA-editing enzyme to...

2010-05-27 10:26:38

The use of modified measles virus may represent a new treatment for a childhood brain tumor known as medulloblastoma, according to a new study appearing in Neuro-Oncology. Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant central nervous system tumor of childhood, accounting for about 20 percent of pediatric brain tumors. These tumors are located in the cerebellum, the area of the brain that controls balance and other complex motor functions. Refinements in treatment have increased the 5-year...


Word of the Day
tessitura
  • The prevailing range of a vocal or instrumental part, within which most of the tones lie.
This word is Italian in origin and comes from the Latin 'textura,' web, structure.