Quantcast

Latest Measurement of biodiversity Stories

2013-10-29 11:27:10

In a novel study, a University of Oklahoma researcher and collaborators found a common bioindicator, Hyalella azteca, used to test the toxicity of water or sediment was resistant to insecticides used in agricultural areas of central California. The study is the first to demonstrate that the indicator species may adapt to polluted conditions of a habitat and become an entirely unreliable source of information about ecosystem health. Gary Wellborn, professor of biology in the OU College of...

2013-02-11 16:34:42

Biodiversity statistics reveal mixed results in Court makeup Although the current Supreme Court has been criticized for its lack of diversity on the bench, the Court is actually more diverse overall today than ever in history, according to a new study that borrows statistical methods from ecology to reveal a more precise picture of diversity. The study, which appears in the online edition of the Journal of Empirical Legal Studies, examines seven categories of diversity for every Supreme...

2012-10-17 11:44:49

Ecologists in the University of Georgia Odum School of Ecology have found that evolutionary diversity can be an effective method for identifying hotspots of mammal biodiversity. In a paper published Oct. 17 in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, they report that evolutionary diversity can be an effective proxy for both the sheer number of species as well as their characteristics and ecological roles. Their findings could help conservation organizations better protect threatened...

2011-11-10 15:35:29

There are few universal rules in ecology, but arguably one is the relationship between the area of a study plot and the number of species counted within that plot, the so called species-area relationship. Larger study plots obviously host on average more species than do smaller plots, and ecologists have long sought a universal description of this relationship. Recently, it has been suggested that a universal species-area relationship can be calculated using Maximum Entropy methods once we...

2011-07-06 10:14:00

CLEVELAND, July 6, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- EnviroScience, Inc. was recently honored as one of the top places to work, ranking 6th out of 60 ranked small businesses in Northeast Ohio as listed in the Top Workplaces 2011 awards published by the Cleveland Plain Dealer. The Top Workplaces 2011 award holds special significance because the selections are based upon the opinions of the employees. The top companies were ranked by the results of a 24 question survey. Employees' opinions provided on...

2010-05-04 14:50:05

Researchers in India have demonstrated that microscopic aquatic creatures could be used as the ecological equivalent of a canary in a coalmine for assessing inland freshwater lakes and ponds. Writing in the World Review of Science, Technology and Sustainable Development the team explains how diatoms respond badly to pollutants and sewage contamination. Bijaya Kumar Padhi, Jnanendra Rath, and Pratap Kumar Padhy of the Visva-Bharati University, in Santiniketan, India, have looked at the...

2009-12-10 10:39:00

SAN FRANCISCO, Dec. 10 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) expected to be released today by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) is on the right track with a focus on testing people's bodies for chemical contamination, say environmental health advocates working on chemical exposure issues. According to Pamela K. Miller, executive director of Alaska Community Action on Toxics, "While we are very relieved the CDC is stepping up its focus...

227217c7cf698f7798e9398abe3001b01
2009-07-10 08:50:00

Ask biologists how many species live in a pond, a grassland, a mountain range or on the entire planet, and the answers get increasingly vague. Hence the wide range of estimates for the planet's biodiversity, predicted to be between 2 million and 50 million species.A new way of estimating species richness reported this month in the journal Ecology Letters by University of California, Berkeley, ecologist John Harte and colleagues, will make such estimates more precise for habitats of all sizes...

2006-03-17 16:15:02

By Marie-Louise Gumuchian NAIROBI (Reuters) - From skull caves in southern Kenya to Mexico's searing Chihuahuan desert, preserving sacred sites is key to slowing the loss of animal and plant species, environmentalists said on Saturday. Experts have pinpointed a string of religious sites across the globe as pilot ecosystems where local customs have helped safeguard troves of biological richness. A new $1.7 million U.N.-led initiative aims to help protect those sites by documenting...


Word of the Day
jument
  • A beast of burden; also, a beast in general.
'Jument' ultimately comes from the Latin 'jugum,' yoke.
Related