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Last updated on April 17, 2014 at 1:21 EDT

Latest MediaFLO Stories

2008-02-05 08:31:15

Watching "Lost" episodes on your cell phone's tiny screen may or may not appeal to you, but various forces are tinkering with technologies that will let you do just that. In fact, wireless carriers are already offering TV service in certain areas and on certain phones, and the TV industry is in the process of adopting a standard that will let TV stations broadcast to mobile devices, including cell phones with the proper tuners. Mobile TV viewing could blossom in about a year...

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2008-01-07 12:45:00

LG Electronics Inc. and Harris Corp. announced on Sunday that they will be ready to begin their push to join the cell phone broadcasting market as early as next year with the new Mobile Pedestrian Handheld (MPH) technology. This new technology could allow broadcasters to finally challenge cell-phone carriers, who are trying to corner the mobile TV market via their own transmissions. In an interview by Associated Press (AP), Howard Lance, the chairman and chief executive officer for Harris...

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2006-04-06 12:45:00

SEOUL -- Global mobile phone operators hope mobile TV will be the next big money spinner, but if South Korea is anything to go by, their optimism may be misplaced. As mobile call rates sag in established markets, operators in Asia, Europe and the United States are gearing up for mobile TV broadcasting, a market that could be worth $8.4 billion by 2010, according to London-based Informa Telecoms & Media. Despite industry excitement, analysts say carriers may end up with only a fraction of...

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2006-02-07 14:55:00

HELSINKI -- Antti Kohtala believes mobile TV has one serious problem: it cannot match up to the real thing. "At home, it was impossible to watch an ice hockey match. We could hear the neighbors celebrating well before we could see the goal on the screen of our phone," said Kohtala, a telecoms regulator who took part in the first Finnish mobile TV trial. It takes 20 seconds longer for a TV signal to land on the screen of a mobile phone than on a normal TV set, he found. But that, other...

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2005-09-03 13:40:00

SAN FRANCISCO -- Want to watch TV on your mobile phone? The wireless industry is betting billions that you do. And they're not talking about just downloading or streaming on-demand videoclips to your phone. Efforts are afoot to broadcast TV programming nationwide to a new generation of mobile phones that can tune in, just like an at-home TV. Despite the billions of dollars U.S. wireless operators have spent upgrading their networks to offer such multimedia content as videos and music, they...