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Last updated on April 19, 2014 at 18:42 EDT

Latest Medical College of Georgia Stories

2014-03-31 13:22:25

The most frequently used mechanical circulatory assist device in the world may have untapped potential, physicians say. One of many uses for the intra-aortic balloon pump is helping ensure adequate oxygen and blood delivery to a heart struggling to resume beating in the aftermath of coronary bypass surgery, said Dr. Mary Arthur, cardiovascular anesthesiologist at the Medical College of Georgia and Georgia Regents Health System. However physicians have been advised not to use the balloon...

2014-03-31 12:10:17

Nearly half of patients with the most common form of adult leukemia are said to have normal chromosomes but appear instead to have a distinct pattern of genetic abnormalities that could better define their prognosis and treatment, researchers report. Using microarray technology that probes millions of genes within chromosomes, researchers found the unique pattern in the leukemia cells of 22 patients diagnosed with cytogenetically normal acute myelogenous leukemia, said Dr. Ravindra Kolhe,...

2014-02-27 19:05:09

Cognitive decline that often accompanies obesity and diabetes can be reversed with regular exercise or surgical removal of belly fat, scientists report. A drug already used to treat rheumatoid arthritis also helps obese/diabetic adult mice regain their ability to learn and comprehend, while transplanting belly fat to a normal mouse reduces those abilities, said Dr. Alexis M. Stranahan, neuroscientist at the Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University. Studies in humans and...

2014-01-08 11:12:42

A well-documented suppressor of immunity that's used by fetuses and tumors alike, just may be able to change its spots, researchers report. In the face of a significant bacterial infection, for example, indoleomine 2,3-dioxegenase, or IDO, also appears capable of helping key immune cells called macrophages produce inflammation to destroy the invader, said Dr. Tracy L. McGaha, immunologist at the Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University and GRU Cancer Center. The...

2013-10-09 12:58:21

A simple video camera paired with complex algorithms appears to provide an accurate means to remotely monitor heart and respiration rates day or night, researchers report. The inexpensive method for monitoring the vital signs without touching a patient could have major implications for telemedicine, including enabling rapid detection of a heart attack or stroke occurring at home and helping avoid sudden infant death syndrome, according to a study published in the journal PLOS ONE. It...

2013-09-16 10:36:23

Dr. David Pollock has a simple message for fellow hypertension researchers: think endothelin. In a country where better than 30 percent of adults have high blood pressure and 50-75 percent of those have salt-sensitive hypertension, he believes the powerful endothelin system, which helps the body eliminate salt, should not be essentially ignored. However, the research and clinical world focus on suppressing a better-known system, which prompts the body to hold onto salt, said Pollock,...

First Estrogen Receptor Mutation Identified In A Young Woman
2013-07-11 13:00:14

Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University A receptor mutation that essentially blocks estrogen's action has been identified for the first time in a female, researchers report. The 18-year-old wasn't experiencing breast development or menstruation, classic symptoms of too little estrogen, the usual cause of delayed puberty. Subsequent studies revealed instead sky-high levels of the sex hormone in her blood, said Dr. Lawrence C. Layman, Chief of the Section of Reproductive...

2013-04-29 15:34:05

The tiny thymus teaches the immune system to ignore the teeming, foreign bacteria in the gut that helps you digest and absorb food, researchers say. When immune cells recognize essential gut bacteria as foreign, inflammatory bowel disease such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease can be the painful, debilitating result. In a study published in the journal Nature, researchers show that the regulatory T cells, or Tregs, that keep this from happening in most of us come from the tiny...

2013-04-16 19:33:04

Researchers may have found a way to block kidney-destroying inflammation and help damaged kidney cells recover. In a related study, they report progress on a non-invasive method to assess how much kidney function has survived a serious bout of inflammation or a chronic problem like high blood pressure. The diagnostic tool could help physicians make hard choices about whether a patient has enough kidney function left to benefit from treatment or whether dialysis or a transplant is in...

2013-03-22 09:31:23

Food and environment can chemically alter your gene function and scientists have identified a gene that is consistently altered in obesity. The gene LY86 was among a group of 100 genes identified as likely contributors to obesity through genome-wide association studies comparing the DNA of thousands of obese and lean individuals, said Dr. Shaoyong Su, genetic epidemiologist at the Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University. Su looked at progressively larger groups of obese...