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Latest Medical diagnosis Stories

2012-06-25 16:27:39

Results from the first use of this technique in the clinic The first report of the diagnostic use of the technique of exome sequencing, where short sequences of DNA are analyzed, shows that it can give good results at low cost, a researcher from The Netherlands will tell the annual conference of the European Society of Human Genetics today (Monday). The scientists were able to perform a genetic diagnosis in around 20% of 100 cases of patients with intellectual disability (ID) and 50% of...

Clarity Starts At Exome
2012-06-13 21:11:42

Sequencing protein-making part of genome can change diagnosis and patient care In the June 13 issue of Science Translational Medicine, an international team led by researchers from the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine reports that the new technology of exome sequencing is not only a promising method for identifying disease-causing genes, but may also improve diagnoses and guide individual patient care. In exome sequencing, researchers selectively and simultaneously...

Overdiagnosis Of Illnesses Is Harmful
2012-05-31 07:23:20

Connie K. Ho for RedOrbit.com For some time, prevention and early detection were thought to be the best ways to treat illnesses. However, a new study describes how these two factors have unknowingly driven up the number of overdiagnoses. In a feature published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ), Ray Moynihan, a Senior Research Fellow at Bond University in Australia, states that "overdiagnosis poses a significant threat to human health by labeling healthy people as sick and wasting...

2012-05-08 09:50:39

Advanced high-speed gene-sequencing has been used in the clinical setting to find diagnoses for seven children out of a dozen who were experiencing developmental delays and congenital abnormalities for mysterious reasons. "I thought if we could obtain even a couple of relatively secure diagnoses out of the 12 patients, that would prove the value of deploying sequencing approaches systematically in patients with unknown but apparently genetic conditions," said David Goldstein, Ph.D.,...


Latest Medical diagnosis Reference Libraries

Electrocardiography
2013-04-30 09:55:53

Electrocardiography, sometimes called ECG or EKG, is a measurement of the electrical activity of the heart as the linear process unfolds. With the use of electrodes that are attached to the skin, this non-invasive test can provide vast information as to the patient’s status. By leaving the electrodes attached, the patient’s status can be monitored over intervals of time and recorded on the device. This data can be sent electronically for consults about potential treatments without delay....

Auscultation
2012-11-18 19:26:05

Auscultation performed by a physician during a physical exam can give the physician clues whether the body is performing as it should or help pinpoint problems that may be occurring. Immediate auscultation was a procedure used to assist the physician with diagnosis and dates back to possibly Ancient Egypt. This is where no instrument is used and the sounds are heard with the ear being placed upon the patient. History Ascultation is based on a Latin verb auscultare, which means to listen....

0_ef15535bdaf8c485c396cc8ab251a70b
2010-09-24 17:35:29

The stethoscope is an acoustic medical device used for listening the internal sounds of the body. It can be used to listen to lung, heart, and intestines as well as blood flow in the arteries. With a sphygmomanometer it can be used to measure blood pressure. Along with listening to bodies a stethoscope might be employed to listen to automobiles to diagnose any damage as well as used to check scientific vacuum chambers for leaks. A phonendoscope is a stethoscope that intensifies sounds. In...

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Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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