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Latest Medical Entomology Stories

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2008-11-04 10:37:25

An entomologist at the Illinois Natural History Survey, a division of the new UI Institute for Natural Resource Sustainability, says smaller mosquitoes are more likely to be infected with viruses that cause diseases in humans. These findings can be found in the November issue of the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. Barry Alto, Ph.D., Director of the Medical Entomology Program at the Illinois Natural History Survey, along with Assistant Professor Michael Reiskind of Oklahoma...

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2005-06-16 07:20:00

Tulane researcher seeks to build a better bug trap For almost an hour at a time, twice a day, two days a week in the deep heat of a Louisiana summer, Dawn Wesson stands in an urban backyard like a human scarecrow, arms spread wide, trying to attract mosquitoes. She wears no repellant, but she does wear full protective gear, including a lightweight coverall with head net and gloves. The two species of mosquitoes that can transmit yellow fever and dengue fever will be attracted to her odor and...


Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
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