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2014-07-28 16:26:17

Ori J. Braun and James Fulton to help advance company growth and development of innovative operating room technology CLEVELAND, July 28, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Surgical Theater, LLC announced today the addition of two new members to its Business Advisory Board. New members include Ori J. Braun, former Senior Vice President for Business Development and New Technologies for Given Imaging Ltd., and James (Jim) Fulton, former Senior Vice President and General Manager of Philips...

2014-07-28 13:28:02

University of Oxford Oxford University scientists have shown that a powerful drug given at the time of a kidney transplant operation not only halves the early risk of rejection, but that it also allows a less toxic regimen of anti-rejection drugs to be used after the operation. The key results are reported in The Lancet and presented at the World Transplant Congress in San Francisco today. They will help doctors faced with a difficult transplant conundrum: the powerful combinations of...

2014-07-28 13:25:26

University of Manchester Scientists from The University of Manchester have discovered why medication to treat asthma and pneumonia can become ineffective. The findings, published in Nature Medicine, show that drugs widely used to treat lung diseases work with the body clock. In the UK pneumonia, which is caused by an infection, affects around 1 in 1000 adults each year and is more serious for babies, young children, the elderly, smokers and those with an underlying health condition....

2014-07-28 13:22:50

Cancer Research UK Cancer Research UK scientists at Barts Cancer Institute have found that targeting a molecule in blood vessels can make cancer therapy significantly more effective, according to research published in Nature today (Sunday). The team at Barts Cancer Institute, part of Queen Mary University of London, have found that a molecule, called focal adhesion kinase (FAK), signals the body to repair itself after chemotherapy or radiotherapy, which kill cancer cells by damaging...

2014-07-28 13:20:36

The Lancet Infected patients and could improve treatment uptake Two new pill-only antiviral drug regimens could provide shorter, more effective treatment options with fewer side effects for the majority of patients infected with hepatitis C, even those most difficult to treat, according to the results of two studies published in The Lancet. Both studies focused on hepatitis C genotype 1, which is the most common genotype in the USA, Europe, North Asia, Australia, and South America,...

2014-07-28 13:17:19

The Lancet The first systematic analysis of hepatitis E virus (HEV) transmission by blood components indicates that about 1 in 3000 donors in England have HEV in their plasma. The findings, published in The Lancet, suggest that around 1200 HEV-containing blood components (eg, red cells, platelets, and fresh frozen plasma) are likely to be transfused every year in England. The study retrospectively screened 225 000 individual blood donations collected in south east England between Oct,...

2014-07-28 13:14:57

University of Leeds Giving parents access to a website containing information about the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine is the most cost-effective way of increasing its uptake, new University of Leeds research has found. Informing parents about the vaccine via a website containing information helping parents make a decision about MMR is on average £9.20 cheaper per vaccination to the NHS than informing them solely via a GP consultation, and £7.17 cheaper than via a leaflet...

2014-07-28 13:07:01

American College of Emergency Physicians A new system that sent patients to designated cardiac receiving centers dramatically increased the survival rate of victims of sudden cardiac arrest in Arizona, according to a study published online yesterday in Annals of Emergency Medicine (Statewide Regionalization of Postarrest Care for Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: Association With Survival and Neurologic Outcome). “We knew lives would be saved if the hospitals implemented the latest...

2014-07-28 12:57:00

Emory University An experimental anti-inflammatory drug can protect vulnerable neurons and reduce motor deficits in a rat model of Parkinson’s disease, researchers at Emory University School of Medicine have shown. The results were published Thursday, July 24 in the Journal of Parkinson’s Disease. The findings demonstrate that the drug, called XPro1595, can reach the brain at sufficient levels and have beneficial effects when administered by subcutaneous injection, like an...

2014-07-28 12:54:29

UT Southwestern Medical Center A protein that controls when genes are switched on or off plays a key role in specific areas of the brain to regulate metabolism, UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have found. The research potentially could lead to new therapies to treat obesity and diabetes, since the transcription factor involved – spliced X-box binding protein 1 (Xbp1s) – appears to influence the body's sensitivity to insulin and leptin signaling. Insulin and leptin are...


Latest Medicine Reference Libraries

Pharmacophobia
2013-12-24 12:55:45

Pharmacophobia or medication phobia, comes from Greek pharmakon, meaning “drug, medicine” and phobos, meaning “fear”, is the fear of the use of pharmacological treatments. In severe, excessive, and irrational cases, it might be a type of specific phobia. While lack of awareness by patient of adverse drug reactions can have a serious consequence, having a phobia of medications can also have serious detrimental effects on the patient’s health. Medication phobia can also lead to...

Pork Tapeworm, Taenia solium
2014-01-12 00:00:00

The pork tapeworm (Taenia solium), also known simply as a tapeworm, is a species of parasitic worm that is classified within the Platyhelminthes phylum. This species infects pigs and humans in many areas of the world including Africa, Southern Europe, Asia, South America, and some areas of North America. This species can cause cysticercosis in its larval stage, which is one of the major causes of seizures in humans. The pork tapeworm can reach an average body length between 2 to 3 meters, but...

Rodent Tapeworm. Hymenolepis microstoma
2014-01-12 00:00:00

The rodent tapeworm (Hymenolepis microstoma) is a parasitic worm that is classified within the Platyhelminthes phylum. This species affects rodents across the world, causing hymenolepiasis, but it does not often affect humans. Most of the available information regarding tapeworms is derived from the studies conducted on this worm and the other members of its genus, Hymenolepis. These worms have been present in laboratories since the 1950's and can either be raised and kept in a culture or be...

Paragonimus westermani
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Paragonimus westermani is a species of fluke, or flatworm that is classified within the Platyhelminthes phylum. This species is abundant in South America and Asia and affects the lungs of humans and other hosts. It was first discovered in 1878 in Europe after two Bengal tigers died. In 1879, Ringer found this species in the lungs of a human. Manson and Erwin von Baelz identified the sputum and eggs separately in 1880, after which Manson asserted that a snail was most likely the worm's...

Echocardiogram
2013-07-29 11:11:00

An echocardiogram is a test that, much like an ultrasound, uses sound waves to create a moving image of the heart. The most common type of echocardiogram is performed transthoracic, meaning the image is taken through a probe against the chest. A TTE does not involve radiation and is a very safe procedure. A cardiac sonographer will put a gel on the patient's chest and move the transducer around different areas, including directly anterior to the breastbone, inferior and lateral to the right...

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Word of the Day
toccata
  • In music, a work for a keyboard-instrument, like the pianoforte or organ, originally intended to utilize and display varieties of touch: but the term has been extended so as to include many irregular works, similar to the prelude, the fantasia, and the improvisation.
This word is Italian in origin, coming from the feminine past participle of 'toccare,' to touch.
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