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Last updated on April 19, 2014 at 18:42 EDT
Neanderthals Were No Strangers To Good Parenting

Neanderthals Were No Strangers To Good Parenting

University of York Archaeologists at the University of York are challenging the traditional view that Neanderthal childhood was difficult, short and dangerous. A research team from PALAEO (Centre for Human Palaeoecology and Evolutionary...

Latest Megafauna Stories

2014-04-17 16:25:14

SAN DIEGO, April 17, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- A team of scientists from Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute (HSWRI) and SeaWorld San Diego has provided the strongest evidence yet that killer whale dialects are learned. http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnvar/20140416/75801 Scheduled to be published this week in the Journal of Experimental Biology, the study found that juvenile male killer whales are capable of learning new call types when they undergo a change in social association....

2014-04-08 04:22:40

A multi-million USD contract encompasses the administration of Wesleyan Closed Books HOLON, Israel, April 8, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Sapiens International Corporation, (NASDAQ and TASE: SPNS), a leading global provider of software solutions for the insurance industry, with an emerging focus on the broader financial services sector, announced today that Wesleyan Assurance Society (Wesleyan), a Birmingham-based mutual offering specialist financial advice and solutions to niche...

Tracking Ecology Of sperm Whales Through Stomach Contents
2014-04-07 07:48:42

University of Massachusetts at Amherst In the largest regional study of its type to date, marine ecologists offer better understanding of the feeding ecologies of 2 very rare sperm whale species in waters off the southeast US coast, adding baseline data they say are important as climate change, fishing and pollution alters the animals' environment and food sources. “Understanding what resources support populations of these incredibly rare animals is important to conservation,”...

Japan Loses Against Australia, UN In Fight To Continue Annual Whaling
2014-03-31 14:48:05

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Japan’s highly-contentious whaling campaign experienced a major setback on Monday when a United Nations court ruled that the island nation could no longer continue its annual whale hunt in the waters around Antarctica. The International Court of Justice ruled in favor of Australia, which had sued Japan and rejected that country’s argument that the whaling has been conducted mainly for scientific reasons. “The court concludes,...

2014-03-27 13:18:34

Whales dive to nearly 2 miles depth, for over 2 hours Scientists monitored Cuvier's beaked whales' record-breaking dives to depths of nearly two miles below the ocean surface and some dives lasted for over two hours, according to results published March 26, 2014, in the open access journal PLOS ONE by Gregory Schorr from Cascadia Research Collective and colleagues. Distributed throughout the world's oceans, the Cuvier's beaked whales' frequent dives deep into the ocean make them...

Skin Bacterial Communities Similar Across Humpback Whale Populations
2014-03-27 08:48:25

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The omnipresence of bacteria in the environment as well as on our own skin makes research on how they affect human health an important topic in the scientific and medical community. But little is known about the identity or function of skin bacteria that is found on other mammals. Researchers, led by microbiologist Amy Apprill from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, have conducted a widespread study on the bacterial...

2014-03-24 23:28:38

"Why the Universe Bothers to Exist" offers a striking breakthrough in the origins controversy, wherein the debate is now resolved. (PRWEB) March 24, 2014 According to the author, Adam and Eve became the first fully sentient humans upon partaking of the tree of knowledge in the Garden of Eden. Upon their disobedience, the “fall” results as God had warned. Their souls are banished to Homo sapiens recipients, prepared by God through His control of natural process on planet...

Passive Acoustic Monitoring Reveals Clues To Calling Behavior And Movements Of The Minke Whale
2014-03-20 16:10:55

NOAA Scientists using passive acoustic monitoring to track minke whales in the Northwest Atlantic have found clues in the individual calling behaviors and movements of this species. These findings, recently published online in the journal Behaviour, provide insight into one of the least studied baleen whales. “Although we regularly observe minke whales in our Gulf of Maine surveys, we know very little about minke whale vocalizations and how they use sound in their behavioral and...

Understanding Binge Eating And Obesity
2014-03-19 16:49:17

[ Watch The Video: Studying Food Reward and Motivation in Humans ] The Journal of Visualized Experiments A key challenge in evaluating anti-obesity treatment is determining how to objectively measure a person's desire to eat; with concerns about obesity on the rise, a research team from the University of Cambridge shares a possible solution Researchers at the University of Cambridge have developed a novel method for evaluating the treatment of obesity-related food behavior. In...

Cattle Domestication Helped People Develop Tolerance To Lactose
2014-03-14 08:26:09

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online While most people lose the ability to digest the milk sugar lactose after infancy, some populations retain high levels of an enzyme called lactase, which allows them to continue to reap the nutritive benefits of milk – and now the authors of a new study believe they have discovered the genetic origins of this particular trait. In the study, an international team of experts detail how they investigated lactase persistence in...


Latest Megafauna Reference Libraries

Cetology
2013-10-02 11:21:29

Cetology is a branch of marine mammal science that studies about eighty species of dolphins, whales, and porpoise, all of which are classified within the Cetacea order. Cetologists, who practice cetology, work to understand the distribution, development, behavior, and other aspects of cetaceans. The study of cetaceans began in the Classical era. About 2,300 years ago, Aristotle documented details about some cetacean species, calling them mammals, while traveling on the Aegean Sea with...

Dall’s Porpoise, Phocoenoides dalliz
2013-08-29 10:15:35

Dall’s porpoise (Phocoenoides dalliz) can only be found in the North Pacific, with a range that includes the Sea of Japan and the Okhotsk and Bering Seas. This range extends to southern California in the east and to the southern waters of Japan in the west. When normal weather patterns change and waters become colder, this species can be found in in Baja, California, specifically in Scammon's Lagoon, and strays can occasionally be found in the Chukchi Sea. It prefers to reside in cold...

North Atlantic Right Whale, Eubalaena glacialis
2013-08-26 11:17:56

The North Atlantic right whale (Eubalaena glacialis), also known as the black right whale or the northern right whale, is one of three right whales in the Eubalaena genus. It can be found in a small population of about 396 individuals in the western North Atlantic. If it does occur in the eastern North Atlantic, experts assert that it only numbers in the tens, making it nearly extinct in that area. This species migrates into the western North Atlantic to feed in the spring, summer, and fall...

Con Rit
2013-08-26 07:37:45

The con rit is a mythical creature of the oceans around southeast Asia, mainly off the coast of Vietnam. It is considered to be a type of sea serpent but with a strange appearance. Vietnamese folklore considers the con rit as a water dragon. In Vietnamese, the word con rit translates to millipede. Resembling a giant millipede, it is said to be about 50 feet long with jointed and armored segments, each being two to three feet in length with a pair of legs attached. The coloration of this...

Blainville's Beaked Whale, Mesoplodon densirostris
2013-08-17 13:31:16

Blainville’s beaked whale (Mesoplodon densirostris), also known as the dense-beaked whale, can be found in a large range that includes the warm and tropical waters of all oceans. It prefers to reside at depths between 1,600 and 3,000 feet and does not migrate. This species received its common name from Blainville, the man who classified it as Delphinus densirostris after studying a description of a piece of one individual’s nose located in the Paris Museum. In 1846, John Edward Gray...

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