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Latest Megafauna Stories

Australians Attack Japanese Whaling
2013-06-26 12:34:52

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Australia stood up at the United Nation's highest court on Wednesday and defended the largest mammals on Earth. Representatives argued before the International Court of Justice (ICJ) in The Hague that Japan's excuse to hunt whales for "scientific" purposes is nothing more than a disguise to simply hunt whales. Australia argued that Japan is exploiting a loophole by continuing to hunt whales as "scientific research" in spite of a...

2013-06-25 23:21:15

BeingHuman.org hosts Leading Anthropologists to Ponder Why We are Hooked on Love & the Future of the Human Heart San Francisco, CA (PRWEB) June 25, 2013 BeingHuman.org announces that Being Human 2013 will feature a fascinating segment exploring the biology of love, the evolution of sexuality, and how we choose our mates. Presented on Saturday, September 28, 2013 in San Francisco’s magnificent Nourse Theater, the "Love & Sex" segment will feature some of the world’s...

Evolutionary Formula For Large Body Size
2013-06-25 15:01:16

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A team of international scientists has found a connection between mammals’ body size and evolutionary development, according to a new report in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B. The study examined the maximum size of mammalian species – including whales, primates and rodents – since the last ice age and found the weight of a baby mammal relative to its adult body mass is a key factor in determining whether a mammal...

Mesolithic Human Travelers Brought Snails To Ireland
2013-06-20 10:45:32

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Previous studies have suggested that the islands of Great Britain and Northern Ireland began to separate from the European mainland around 10,000 years ago, with a massive tsunami completing the process about 8,000 years ago. Any land animals to naturally migrate to the two islands would have to have made the trip before this separation. With this set of circumstances in mind, scientists have long wondered why Ireland has some plants...

Deep Breaths: The Evolution Of Diving Mammals
2013-06-14 07:14:57

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study led by the University of Liverpool sheds new light on how diving mammals, such as the sperm whale, have evolved to be able to submerge for long periods underwater without breathing. The international team, led by Dr. Michael Berenbrink, from the University's Institute of Integrative Biology, identified a distinctive molecular signature of the oxygen-binding protein myoglobin in the sperm whale and other diving mammals....

High-Pitched Echolocation Helps Harbor Porpoises Avoid Killer Whales
2013-06-12 14:17:20

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Researchers from the University of Southern Denmark (SDU) have determined why harbour porpoises are doing so well in coastal and busy waters. The team wrote in the journal Frontiers in Physiology that these animals are able to thrive through the Northern Hemisphere due to their sophisticated echolocation abilities. Coastal waters like the ones harbor porpoises live in can be challenging for whales due to the risk of beaching and...

2013-06-06 11:49:18

Efforts to restore sturgeon in the Great Lakes region have received a lot of attention in recent years, and many of the news stories note that the prehistoric-looking fish are "living fossils" virtually unchanged for millions of years. But a new study by University of Michigan researchers and their colleagues reveals that in at least one measure of evolutionary change–changes in body size over time–sturgeon have been one of the fastest-evolving fish on the planet. "Sturgeon...


Latest Megafauna Reference Libraries

Cetology
2013-10-02 11:21:29

Cetology is a branch of marine mammal science that studies about eighty species of dolphins, whales, and porpoise, all of which are classified within the Cetacea order. Cetologists, who practice cetology, work to understand the distribution, development, behavior, and other aspects of cetaceans. The study of cetaceans began in the Classical era. About 2,300 years ago, Aristotle documented details about some cetacean species, calling them mammals, while traveling on the Aegean Sea with...

Dall’s Porpoise, Phocoenoides dalliz
2013-08-29 10:15:35

Dall’s porpoise (Phocoenoides dalliz) can only be found in the North Pacific, with a range that includes the Sea of Japan and the Okhotsk and Bering Seas. This range extends to southern California in the east and to the southern waters of Japan in the west. When normal weather patterns change and waters become colder, this species can be found in in Baja, California, specifically in Scammon's Lagoon, and strays can occasionally be found in the Chukchi Sea. It prefers to reside in cold...

North Atlantic Right Whale, Eubalaena glacialis
2013-08-26 11:17:56

The North Atlantic right whale (Eubalaena glacialis), also known as the black right whale or the northern right whale, is one of three right whales in the Eubalaena genus. It can be found in a small population of about 396 individuals in the western North Atlantic. If it does occur in the eastern North Atlantic, experts assert that it only numbers in the tens, making it nearly extinct in that area. This species migrates into the western North Atlantic to feed in the spring, summer, and fall...

Con Rit
2013-08-26 07:37:45

The con rit is a mythical creature of the oceans around southeast Asia, mainly off the coast of Vietnam. It is considered to be a type of sea serpent but with a strange appearance. Vietnamese folklore considers the con rit as a water dragon. In Vietnamese, the word con rit translates to millipede. Resembling a giant millipede, it is said to be about 50 feet long with jointed and armored segments, each being two to three feet in length with a pair of legs attached. The coloration of this...

Blainville's Beaked Whale, Mesoplodon densirostris
2013-08-17 13:31:16

Blainville’s beaked whale (Mesoplodon densirostris), also known as the dense-beaked whale, can be found in a large range that includes the warm and tropical waters of all oceans. It prefers to reside at depths between 1,600 and 3,000 feet and does not migrate. This species received its common name from Blainville, the man who classified it as Delphinus densirostris after studying a description of a piece of one individual’s nose located in the Paris Museum. In 1846, John Edward Gray...

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Word of the Day
callithump
  • A somewhat riotous parade, accompanied with the blowing of tin horns, and other discordant noises; also, a burlesque serenade; a charivari.
'Callithump' is a back-formation of 'callithumpian,' a 'fanciful formation' according to the Oxford English Dictionary. However, the English Dialect Dictionary, says 'Gallithumpians' is a Dorset and Devon word from the 1790s that refers to 'a society of radical social reformers' or 'noisy disturbers of elections and meetings.'
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