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Latest Megafauna Stories

Deep Breaths: The Evolution Of Diving Mammals
2013-06-14 07:14:57

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study led by the University of Liverpool sheds new light on how diving mammals, such as the sperm whale, have evolved to be able to submerge for long periods underwater without breathing. The international team, led by Dr. Michael Berenbrink, from the University's Institute of Integrative Biology, identified a distinctive molecular signature of the oxygen-binding protein myoglobin in the sperm whale and other diving mammals....

High-Pitched Echolocation Helps Harbor Porpoises Avoid Killer Whales
2013-06-12 14:17:20

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Researchers from the University of Southern Denmark (SDU) have determined why harbour porpoises are doing so well in coastal and busy waters. The team wrote in the journal Frontiers in Physiology that these animals are able to thrive through the Northern Hemisphere due to their sophisticated echolocation abilities. Coastal waters like the ones harbor porpoises live in can be challenging for whales due to the risk of beaching and...

2013-06-06 11:49:18

Efforts to restore sturgeon in the Great Lakes region have received a lot of attention in recent years, and many of the news stories note that the prehistoric-looking fish are "living fossils" virtually unchanged for millions of years. But a new study by University of Michigan researchers and their colleagues reveals that in at least one measure of evolutionary change–changes in body size over time–sturgeon have been one of the fastest-evolving fish on the planet. "Sturgeon...

Choices Make Chimps Emotional
2013-05-30 09:48:02

[ Watch the Video: Bonobo Decision-Making ] Michael Harper for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online In the Stanford University Marshmallow Experiment, children are given a simple choice: Eat one marshmallow now or wait a few minutes and get two marshmallows. The results are chock full of cute kids agonizing over their decision to wait for two marshmallows. Some of them even pantomime eating the one marshmallow, and one even sniffs it just to get a flavor of the treat. Stanford...

2013-05-28 23:01:10

Llamas´ Valley May 28 edition includes an exclusive interview with one of the world's top architects, Teresa Sapey, pays a visit to the home of British film director and actor Dexter Fletcher, talks with Dutch entrepreneur Bas Lansdorp about his project to establish the first human colony on Mars, and much more. Cupertino, CA (PRWEB) May 29, 2013 People across the world in search of inspiration, creativity, joy, coziness, and who want to take a delicious bite out of a world...

2013-05-20 23:01:11

Exotic feline fans from around the world will gather in the nation´s country music capital for three days of felines and fun during the annual convention of the premiere wild cat organization, the Feline Conservation Federation. (PRWEB) May 20, 2013 Thursday, June 6th, exotic feline enthusiasts from around the world will gather for three days of learning, networking and fun during the annual convention of the Feline Conservation Federation (FCF). Federation members own and work with...

78726997
2013-05-20 17:57:31

Michael Harper for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online One of the many idiosyncrasies of humanity is our desire to domesticate otherwise wild animals and keep them around as pets. This has generally worked out well for us in regards to small birds, cats, dogs and fish. There are those, however, who push the limits of this domesticity too far and end up endangering the very animal they claim to care for so much. Last week, US Representatives Howard “Buck” McKeon (R-CA)...


Latest Megafauna Reference Libraries

Cetology
2013-10-02 11:21:29

Cetology is a branch of marine mammal science that studies about eighty species of dolphins, whales, and porpoise, all of which are classified within the Cetacea order. Cetologists, who practice cetology, work to understand the distribution, development, behavior, and other aspects of cetaceans. The study of cetaceans began in the Classical era. About 2,300 years ago, Aristotle documented details about some cetacean species, calling them mammals, while traveling on the Aegean Sea with...

Dall’s Porpoise, Phocoenoides dalliz
2013-08-29 10:15:35

Dall’s porpoise (Phocoenoides dalliz) can only be found in the North Pacific, with a range that includes the Sea of Japan and the Okhotsk and Bering Seas. This range extends to southern California in the east and to the southern waters of Japan in the west. When normal weather patterns change and waters become colder, this species can be found in in Baja, California, specifically in Scammon's Lagoon, and strays can occasionally be found in the Chukchi Sea. It prefers to reside in cold...

North Atlantic Right Whale, Eubalaena glacialis
2013-08-26 11:17:56

The North Atlantic right whale (Eubalaena glacialis), also known as the black right whale or the northern right whale, is one of three right whales in the Eubalaena genus. It can be found in a small population of about 396 individuals in the western North Atlantic. If it does occur in the eastern North Atlantic, experts assert that it only numbers in the tens, making it nearly extinct in that area. This species migrates into the western North Atlantic to feed in the spring, summer, and fall...

Con Rit
2013-08-26 07:37:45

The con rit is a mythical creature of the oceans around southeast Asia, mainly off the coast of Vietnam. It is considered to be a type of sea serpent but with a strange appearance. Vietnamese folklore considers the con rit as a water dragon. In Vietnamese, the word con rit translates to millipede. Resembling a giant millipede, it is said to be about 50 feet long with jointed and armored segments, each being two to three feet in length with a pair of legs attached. The coloration of this...

Blainville's Beaked Whale, Mesoplodon densirostris
2013-08-17 13:31:16

Blainville’s beaked whale (Mesoplodon densirostris), also known as the dense-beaked whale, can be found in a large range that includes the warm and tropical waters of all oceans. It prefers to reside at depths between 1,600 and 3,000 feet and does not migrate. This species received its common name from Blainville, the man who classified it as Delphinus densirostris after studying a description of a piece of one individual’s nose located in the Paris Museum. In 1846, John Edward Gray...

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Word of the Day
call-note
  • The call or cry of a bird or other animal to its mate or its young.
'Call-note' is newer than 'bird-call,' which originally referred to 'an instrument for imitating the note of birds' but now also refers to 'the song or cry of a bird.'
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