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Latest Megafauna Stories

Staying Warm For Emperor Penguins Means Getting Into Traffic Jams
2013-12-17 13:44:50

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Emperor penguins purposely get themselves into traffic jams in order to help combat the harsh conditions of an Antarctic winter, according to a new study published in the New Journal of Physics. Researchers used mathematical models to recreate the positions, movements and interactions of individual penguins in a huddle, revealing that an individual penguin only needs to move less than an inch in any direction for its neighbor to react....

Hydra magnipapillata
2013-12-09 05:03:37

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online While we tend to equate youth with strength and old age with weakness, new research appearing in the journal Nature reveals that frailty during the later years of life is not a fixed law of nature, and that some species actually become stronger and less likely to die as they age. Experts from the University of Southern Denmark looked at the aging process in 46 vastly different types of creatures, including mammals, plants and...

Five Distinct Humpback Whale Populations Identified In North Pacific Ocean
2013-12-04 19:40:46

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com – Your Universe Online A new genetic study shows there are five distinct humpback whale populations in the North Pacific Ocean. There is currently a proposal to try and designate North Pacific humpbacks as a single distinct population segment, which could ultimately threaten the species’ endangered status. Humpback whales are listed as endangered in the US under the Endangered Species Act, but the species has recently been downlisted by the...

Killer Whales Use Stealth Approach When Hunting Prey
2013-12-04 04:57:23

[ Watch the Video: Stealthy Tactics Used By Orca To Catch Their Prey ] redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Newly discovered evidence that killer whales can hunt marine mammals during the nighttime has led scientists to suggest that the creatures can use their hearing to help locate prey, according to research presented at the 166th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America (ASA). For example, the study authors said that the whales eavesdrop on male harbor...

Genes Show How Whales Evolved For Oceans
2013-11-25 10:54:21

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Approximately 54 million years ago, whales and other cetaceans diverged from land-dwelling mammals and gradually evolved to live a productive life at sea. A new study published in the journal Nature Genetics on Sunday revealed genetic evidence of how whales evolved the ability to dive deep into the ocean for long periods of time and how they developed a specialized feeding system that uses baleen instead of teeth. In the study, a...

The Most Social Monkeys Have The Most Distinct Facial Features
2013-11-20 15:05:36

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study of Old World monkeys, published in the journal Nature Communications, has suggested that they rely on facial features to recognize each other, particularly for those primates living in larger groups. The new report comes from the same UCLA biologists that released a similar analysis of the faces of nearly 130 New World monkeys from Central and South America in 2012. "Humans are crazy for Facebook, but our research...


Latest Megafauna Reference Libraries

Cetology
2013-10-02 11:21:29

Cetology is a branch of marine mammal science that studies about eighty species of dolphins, whales, and porpoise, all of which are classified within the Cetacea order. Cetologists, who practice cetology, work to understand the distribution, development, behavior, and other aspects of cetaceans. The study of cetaceans began in the Classical era. About 2,300 years ago, Aristotle documented details about some cetacean species, calling them mammals, while traveling on the Aegean Sea with...

Dall’s Porpoise, Phocoenoides dalliz
2013-08-29 10:15:35

Dall’s porpoise (Phocoenoides dalliz) can only be found in the North Pacific, with a range that includes the Sea of Japan and the Okhotsk and Bering Seas. This range extends to southern California in the east and to the southern waters of Japan in the west. When normal weather patterns change and waters become colder, this species can be found in in Baja, California, specifically in Scammon's Lagoon, and strays can occasionally be found in the Chukchi Sea. It prefers to reside in cold...

North Atlantic Right Whale, Eubalaena glacialis
2013-08-26 11:17:56

The North Atlantic right whale (Eubalaena glacialis), also known as the black right whale or the northern right whale, is one of three right whales in the Eubalaena genus. It can be found in a small population of about 396 individuals in the western North Atlantic. If it does occur in the eastern North Atlantic, experts assert that it only numbers in the tens, making it nearly extinct in that area. This species migrates into the western North Atlantic to feed in the spring, summer, and fall...

Con Rit
2013-08-26 07:37:45

The con rit is a mythical creature of the oceans around southeast Asia, mainly off the coast of Vietnam. It is considered to be a type of sea serpent but with a strange appearance. Vietnamese folklore considers the con rit as a water dragon. In Vietnamese, the word con rit translates to millipede. Resembling a giant millipede, it is said to be about 50 feet long with jointed and armored segments, each being two to three feet in length with a pair of legs attached. The coloration of this...

Blainville's Beaked Whale, Mesoplodon densirostris
2013-08-17 13:31:16

Blainville’s beaked whale (Mesoplodon densirostris), also known as the dense-beaked whale, can be found in a large range that includes the warm and tropical waters of all oceans. It prefers to reside at depths between 1,600 and 3,000 feet and does not migrate. This species received its common name from Blainville, the man who classified it as Delphinus densirostris after studying a description of a piece of one individual’s nose located in the Paris Museum. In 1846, John Edward Gray...

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Word of the Day
toccata
  • In music, a work for a keyboard-instrument, like the pianoforte or organ, originally intended to utilize and display varieties of touch: but the term has been extended so as to include many irregular works, similar to the prelude, the fantasia, and the improvisation.
This word is Italian in origin, coming from the feminine past participle of 'toccare,' to touch.
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