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Latest Megalithic monuments Stories

Massive Easter Island Statues Were Walked Into Place Not Rolled
2012-10-26 10:49:10

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online For centuries, magnificent stone structures, known as Moai, have stood at attention, seemingly guarding one of the world´s most remote islands--Polynesia´s Easter Island--from the unknown. But why these statues are here has not been as much of an enigma, as to how they got here. That conundrum, which has been steeped in mystery, may have finally been answered, thanks to the efforts of a team of US anthropologists and...

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2011-03-10 06:10:00

Modern laser scanning is being implemented to study Stonehenge and to search for hidden clues about how and why the ancient wonder was built. Researchers said they are surveying all visible sides of the standing and fallen stones. Some ancient carvings have been found in previous studies, including a famous Neolithic "dagger." The work is expected to be completed by the end of March. "The surfaces of the stones of Stonehenge hold fascinating clues to the past," English Heritage...

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2010-05-12 09:55:00

Archaeologists have disproved the fifty-year-old theory underpinning our understanding of how the famous stone statues were moved around Easter Island. Fieldwork led by researchers at University College London and The University of Manchester, has shown the remote Pacific island's ancient road system was primarily ceremonial and not solely built for transportation of the figures. A complex network of roads up to 800-years-old crisscross the Island between the hat and statue quarries and the...

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2009-09-08 06:20:00

British archaeologists announced on Monday that they think they have deciphered the mystery of the red hats on the huge stone statues on Easter Island. The researchers feel that the answer to the mystery is connected to their find of a road on the island in the Pacific. The hats were constructed in a quarry concealed in the crater of an old volcano, and then transported on tree logs to the statues, wrote the team from the University of Manchester and University College London. The...

2009-08-13 14:44:25

Archaeologists say the oldest timber structure found yet in the London area was discovered during the excavation of a peat bog near Belmarsh Prison. Scientists from University College London's Institute of Archaeology said radiocarbon dating showed the timber platform, or trackway, to be nearly 6,000 years old, predating Stonehenge by more than 500 years. Archaeologists said the structure consisted of a timber platform found at a depth of about 14 feet near an ancient river channel. Officials...

2008-08-27 09:00:50

By Nicola Fenwick A QUARRY company?s controversial plan to extract sand and gravel near a 5,000-year-old monument has finally received approval. But those opposed to Tarmac?s plans for Ladybridge Farm, near Thornborough Henges, between Bedale and Ripon, North Yorkshire, have vowed to fight on. Tarmac runs nearby Nosterfield Quarry, but wants to extract 1.1 million tonnes of sand and gravel from Ladybridge Farm. Permission was granted in January last year, but the decision was quashed...

2007-10-01 09:00:23

Coastal erosion is threatening thousands of ancient and important archaeological sites around our coastline, with many already submerged. Cahal Milmo reports on the race against the tide to save Britain's disappearing history Sinking stones When the Neolithic farmers and hunters of Skara Brae first built their stone houses on Orkney, they were careful to place their settlement more than a mile from the coast to avoid their homes being pounded by the harsh winter storms that sweep across...

2007-08-18 09:16:42

By NO BYLINE POLICE investigating graffiti vandalism at Skara Brae on Orkney - one of Europe's most important prehistoric sites - have issued a description of a man they want to speak to in connection with the crime. (c) 2007 Scotsman, The. Provided by ProQuest Information and Learning. All rights Reserved.

2006-02-12 09:30:00

By Deborah Kyvrikosaios ATHENS -- Greek archaeologists said on Sunday they had discovered the largest underground tomb in Greek antiquity in the ancient city of Pella in northern Greece, birthplace of Alexander the Great. The eight-chamber tomb rich in painted sculpture dates to the Hellenistic period between the 3rd and 2nd century BC and offers scholars a rare glimpse into the life of nobles around the time of Alexander's death. "This is the largest, sculptured, multi-chambered tomb found...