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Latest Meiosis Stories

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2009-11-14 07:49:18

Meiosis "“ the pairing and recombination of chromosomes, followed by segregation of half to each egg or sperm cell "“ is a major crossroads in all organisms reproducing sexually. Yet, how the cell precisely choreographs these chromosomal interactions is a long-standing question. New findings by University of California, Berkeley, scientists show that the cell's cytoskeleton, which moves things around in the cell, plays a critical role, essentially reaching into the nucleus to...

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2009-10-29 06:05:00

U.S. geneticists say that for the first time ever they have successfully managed to induce human embryonic stem cells to transform into germ cells capable of producing egg and sperm cells "” a discovery that not only illuminates a previously ill-understood phase of human development but one that also carries practical potential for the treatment of infertility. Dr. Renee Riejo Pera of Stanford University in California explained that getting back to the earliest phases of human life and...

2009-10-28 22:11:43

Advance provides potential tool to find causes of unexplained infertility, birth defects Researchers funded in part by the National Institutes of Health have discovered how to transform human embryonic stem cells into germ cells, the embryonic cells that ultimately give rise to sperm and eggs. The advance will allow researchers to observe human germ cells"”previously inaccessible"”in laboratory dishes. "This achievement opens a new window into what was only recently a hidden stage...

2009-09-17 09:17:52

A Florida State University scientist says he's found the cause of chromosomal birth defects, such as Down, XYY, Edwards, Patau and Turner's syndromes. Using yeast genetics, Assistant Professor Hong-Guo Yu and colleagues selectively removed a single protein from the cell division process called meiosis and found that when the protein known as Pds5 is missing, chromosomes fail to segregate and pair up properly, and birth defects can result. Researchers said the study shines new light on the...

2009-09-16 15:04:06

Using yeast genetics and a novel scheme to selectively remove a single protein from the cell division process called meiosis, a cell biologist at The Florida State University found that when a key molecular player known as Pds5 goes missing, chromosomes fail to segregate and pair up properly, and birth defects such as Down syndrome can result. That discovery is groundbreaking, but so, too, is what principal investigator Hong-Guo Yu calls the "genetics trick" performed by his research team...

2009-09-14 15:41:39

New insights gained into how polyploidy and genomic change can lead to evolutionary change and plants' fitness and vigor An individual with Down syndrome and a male calico cat have one thing in common"”each has an extra chromosome. For animals, most instances of an extra chromosome result in birth defects or even death, but plants are another matter entirely. Many plants are able to survive the presence of an extra copy of their entire genome (known as polyploidy) and are often even...

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2009-08-17 16:25:00

"A biologist, a physicist, and a nanotechnologist walk into a ..." sounds like the start of a joke. Instead, it was the start of a collaboration that has helped to decipher a critical, but so far largely unstudied, phase of how cells divide. Errors in cell division can cause mutations that lead to cancer, and this study could shed light on the role of chromosome abnormalities in uncontrolled cell replication.The biologist in question is University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine Associate...

2009-08-17 09:24:38

Parents of healthy newborns often remark on the miracle of life. The joining of egg and sperm to create such delightful creatures can seem dazzlingly beautiful if the chromosome information from each parent has been translated properly into the embryo and newborn.The darker side is that when extra copies of chromosomes or fewer than the normal 46 (23 from each parent) are present, tragic birth defects can occur. Now, scientists at the University of Georgia have developed a model system for...

2009-06-08 08:32:37

In a new study, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute scientists disprove a century-old theory about why cancer cells often have too many or too few chromosomes, and show that the actual reason may hold the key to a novel approach to cancer therapy.Since the late 19th century, scientists have attributed the surplus or shortage of intact chromosomes in cancer cells to a kind of fragmentation in cell division: instead of dividing neatly into two identical daughter cells, as normal cells do, cancer cells...

2009-06-07 12:30:00

In a new study, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute scientists disprove a century-old theory about why cancer cells often have too many or too few chromosomes, and show that the actual reason may hold the key to a novel approach to cancer therapy. Since the late 19th century, scientists have attributed the surplus or shortage of intact chromosomes in cancer cells to a kind of fragmentation in cell division: instead of dividing neatly into two identical daughter cells, as normal cells do, cancer...


Word of the Day
bibliopole
  • A bookseller; now, especially, a dealer in rare and curious books.
This word comes from a Greek phrase meaning 'book seller.'
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