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Latest Membrane biology Stories

Xray Maps GPCR
2013-12-20 12:57:28

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Researchers have used one of the brightest X-ray sources in the world to map the three-dimensional structure of an important cellular gatekeeper known as a G protein-coupled receptor, or GPCR, in a more natural state than has been previously possible. The new technique, described Friday in the journal Science, is a major leap forward in exploring GPCRs, a vast, hard-to-study family of proteins that plays a key role in human health...

2013-12-18 11:24:32

Innovation could lead to faster drug therapies and increased understanding of proteins on the microscopic level Membrane proteins are the “gatekeepers” that allow information and molecules to pass into and out of a cell. Until recently, the microscopic study of these complex proteins has been restricted due to limitations of “force microscopes” that are available to researchers and the one-dimensional results these microscopes reveal. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri...

2013-12-18 08:28:28

STRASBOURG AND MONTRÉAL, Dec. 18, 2013 /PRNewswire/ - Domain Therapeutics, a France-based biopharmaceutical company that specializes in the research and development of new drug candidates that target G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), is pleased to announce the signing of a licensing and partnership agreement on GPCR biosensor technology with Université de Montréal (UdeM) and its commercialization unit, with the Institute for Research in Immunology and Cancer -...

2013-12-16 12:09:02

Research will be presented on Sunday, Dec. 15, during ASCB annual meeting in New Orleans Resolving a fundamental question in cell biology and showing off the powers of new high-resolution 3-D imaging, NIH scientists have discovered where the Golgi apparatus, which sorts newly synthesized proteins for transport inside and outside the cell, goes when it disassembles during cell division, according to research to be presented on Sunday, Dec. 15, at the American Association for Cell Biology...

Intracellular ABC Transporters Allow Leaf Beetle Larvae To Accumulate Defensive Substances When Feeding
2013-12-09 11:58:38

Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology Similar membrane proteins play a crucial role in the transport of toxic substances out of the cell Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, have discovered the decisive biological stimulator for the accumulation of defensive substances in leaf beetle larvae used by the insects to fend off predators: ABC transport proteins, which are found in large quantities in glandular cells of the larvae. The poplar leaf...

How Membrane Transporter Moves
2013-12-03 09:50:42

University of Illinois Researchers have tried for decades to understand the undulations and gyrations that allow transport proteins to shuttle molecules from one side of a cell membrane to the other. Now scientists report that they have found a way to penetrate the mystery. They have worked out every step in the molecular dance that enables one such transporter to do its job. The new findings, reported in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, will help scientists figure...

2013-12-02 21:15:20

Scientists have described a new family of proteins that appear to play a key role in cancer and might be targets for future cancer drugs. A major new study in the journal Nature sets out the structure of the new family, called glutamate intramembrane proteases – the founding member of which plays a critical role in transforming healthy cells into cancer cells. The research, funded by Cancer Research UK and conducted by scientists at The Institute of Cancer Research, London, defined...

2013-11-26 15:05:56

Researchers from the University of Southampton, in collaboration with researchers at the University of Quebec at Montreal, have developed a new microsystem for more efficient testing of pharmaceutical drugs to treat diseases such as cystic fibrosis, MG (myasthenia gravis) and epilepsy. A large percentage of pharmaceutical drugs target ion channels, which are proteins found in a cell's membrane, that play a pivotal role in these serious disorders and that are used to test the effectiveness...

2013-11-25 15:12:05

Researchers from North Carolina State University and Duke University have developed nanoscale “patches” that can be used to sensitize targeted cell receptors, making them more responsive to signals that control cell activity. The finding holds promise for promoting healing and facilitating tissue engineering research. The research takes advantage of the fact that cells in a living organism can communicate via physical contact. Specifically, when targeted receptors on the surface of a...

2013-11-14 13:06:37

Researchers have created tiny protein tubes named after the Roman god Janus which may offer a new way to accurately channel drugs into the body’s cells. Using a process which they liken to molecular Lego, scientists from the University of Warwick and the University of Sydney have created what they have named ‘Janus nanotubes’ – very small tubes with two distinct faces. The study is published in the journal Nature Communications. They are named after the Roman god Janus who is...


Latest Membrane biology Reference Libraries

Esophagus
2013-04-30 13:37:01

The esophagus is the muscular tube that is located between the pharynx and the stomach that aids in digestion during swallowing. Formation and Orientation The esophagus is composed of four separate layers; the mucosa, submucosa, muscularis externa and the adventitia. The mucosa includes the stratified squamous epithelium, lamina propria and muscularis mucosae. The submucosa houses the esophageal glands and connective papillae. The muscularis externa is composed of three sublayers The...

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