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Latest Membrane biology Stories

2013-11-25 15:12:05

Researchers from North Carolina State University and Duke University have developed nanoscale “patches” that can be used to sensitize targeted cell receptors, making them more responsive to signals that control cell activity. The finding holds promise for promoting healing and facilitating tissue engineering research. The research takes advantage of the fact that cells in a living organism can communicate via physical contact. Specifically, when targeted receptors on the surface of a...

2013-11-14 13:06:37

Researchers have created tiny protein tubes named after the Roman god Janus which may offer a new way to accurately channel drugs into the body’s cells. Using a process which they liken to molecular Lego, scientists from the University of Warwick and the University of Sydney have created what they have named ‘Janus nanotubes’ – very small tubes with two distinct faces. The study is published in the journal Nature Communications. They are named after the Roman god Janus who is...

2013-11-01 10:40:00

The ever-increasing threat from "superbugs" -- strains of pathogenic bacteria that are impervious to the antibiotics that subdued their predecessor generations -- has forced the medical community to look for bactericidal weapons outside the realm of traditional drugs. One promising candidate is the antimicrobial peptide (AMP), one of Mother Nature's lesser-known defenses against infections, that kills a pathogen by creating, then expanding, nanometer-sized pores in the cell membrane until it...

2013-10-24 10:26:37

Similar to passengers on an urban transit system, every protein made in the cell has a specific destination and function. Channels in cell membranes help direct these proteins to their appropriate target. Researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) and their colleagues have now captured images of these channels as they open to allow proteins to pass through a membrane, while the proteins are being made. These findings are published as a Letter in Nature (Park, E. et al. 2013)....

2013-10-22 12:36:18

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered a way to effectively deliver staurosporine (STS), a powerful anti-cancer compound that has vexed researchers for more than 30 years due to its instability in the blood and toxic nature in both healthy and cancerous cells. For the first time, the new method safely delivered STS to mouse tumors, suppressing them with no apparent side effects. The results were published online, October 20, in the...

2013-10-15 12:22:30

Biomimetic Membranes on Graphene Open up Novel Applications in Biotechnology – Publication in “Nature Communications“ Researchers around Dr. Michael Hirtz from Karlsruhe Institute of Technology and Dr. Aravind Vijayaraghavan from the University of Manchester have developed a new method to produce artificial membranes: Using a nanoscaled tip, they write tailored patches of phospholipid membrane onto a graphene substrate. The resulting biomimetic membranes, i.e. membranes simulating...


Latest Membrane biology Reference Libraries

Esophagus
2013-04-30 13:37:01

The esophagus is the muscular tube that is located between the pharynx and the stomach that aids in digestion during swallowing. Formation and Orientation The esophagus is composed of four separate layers; the mucosa, submucosa, muscularis externa and the adventitia. The mucosa includes the stratified squamous epithelium, lamina propria and muscularis mucosae. The submucosa houses the esophageal glands and connective papillae. The muscularis externa is composed of three sublayers The...

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Word of the Day
holluschickie
  • A 'bachelor seal'; a young male seal which is prevented from mating by its herd's older males (mated bulls defending their territory).
This comes from the Russian word for 'bachelors.'
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