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Latest Memory Stories

2014-10-29 23:16:45

The Healthy Aging Company introduces HealthyAging Gift Boxes™.

2014-10-29 23:15:14

Morris Psychological Group will be offering memory screenings, free of charge, as part of the Alzheimer's Foundation of America's annual program on November 19, 2014 from 1:30-4:30 pm.

Beauty shots of Cirku extract
2014-10-27 07:07:02

Antioxidant-rich naturally occurring dietary compounds found in cocoa could help reverse age-related memory decline in otherwise healthy older adults, claims research led by Columbia University Medical Center and published Sunday in the journal Nature Neuroscience.

booze brain
2014-10-24 07:47:20

Although alcohol consumption is typically associated with negative effects on the brain, a new study from a team of American researchers has found that people over 60 who are moderate drinkers have better episodic memory, meaning they are better at recalling specific events.

brain activity
2014-10-22 03:00:00

A new study, which may have implications for approaches to education, finds that brain mechanisms engaged when people allow their minds to rest and reflect on things they've learned before may boost later learning.

2014-10-15 16:27:43

Encore presentation on PBS Arts Fall Festival features Elaine Paige in her original role of Grizabella the Glamour Cat, with original Broadway cast member Ken Page reprising his role as Old Deuteronomy

2014-10-14 23:02:02

eReflect shares information about a lesser-known benefit of spelling practice: its ability to improve a person's long-term memory. New York City, NY (PRWEB)

curiosity helps memory
2014-10-06 08:56:12

Want to know how you can learn information more easily? Is your curiosity piqued? According to a new study in the journal Neuron, arousing a person’s curiosity can help them to remember something they may not be particularly interested in.

visual cues - johnny depp
2014-10-06 08:34:56

Johnny Depp has an unforgettable face. Tony Angelotti, his stunt double in “Pirates of the Caribbean,” does not. So why is it that when they’re swashbuckling on screen, audiences worldwide see them both as the same person? UC Berkeley scientists have cracked that mystery.