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Latest Mesolithic Stories

Breakthrough On Understanding Demographic History Of Stone-Age Humans
2014-04-25 03:18:05

Uppsala University An international team led by researchers at Uppsala University and Stockholm University reports a breakthrough on understanding the demographic history of Stone-Age humans. A genomic analysis of eleven Stone-Age human remains from Scandinavia revealed that expanding Stone-age farmers assimilated local hunter-gatherers and that the hunter-gatherers were historically in lower numbers than the farmers. The study is published today, ahead of print, in the journal Science....

Mesolithic Hunter-Gatherers Had Blue Eyes, Dark Skin
2014-01-27 04:48:38

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A 7,000 year old man from the Mesolithic Period, named La Braña 1 and recovered at the La Braña-Arintero site in Valdelugueros, Spain, reportedly had blue eyes and dark skin. The study, published in Nature and led by Carles Lalueza-Fox of the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), represents the first recovered genome of an European hunter-gatherer. Ending with the advent of agriculture and livestock farming from the Middle...

Hunter Gatherers Had Pigs
2013-08-27 13:49:52

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Hunter-gatherers living in Europe around 4600 BC may have had domesticated pigs thanks to incoming Neolithic farmers, according to a new report in the journal Nature Communications. Authors of the report point to evidence of interactions and an exchange of animals between established hunter-gatherer communities and proliferating farming communities around 6,600 years ago. The relationships eventually led to the hunter-gatherers...

Archaeologists Discover World's Oldest Calendar In Scotland
2013-07-15 13:02:07

[ Watch the Video: The Beginning Of Time? ] Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Archaeology experts say they have made a remarkable discover of what could potentially be the world's oldest "calendar." The ancient calendar dates back to around 8,000 BC, predating the first formal time-measuring devices known to man by nearly 5,000 years. The scientists wrote in the journal Internet Archaeology that they believe that understanding when time began to get logged is...

Earliest Evidence Of Burials With Flowers Found In Israel Cave
2013-07-03 07:00:37

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A recent discovery in a cave in Israel has given researchers a new look into how our ancient ancestors treated their dead. Daniel Nadel, an archaeologist at the University of Haifa in Israel, has been leading a team of researchers since 2005 in the excavation efforts at Raqefet Cave on the slopes of Mount Carmel. The discovery was that of a Natufian pair that had been purposely buried together in a grave lined with flowers. The...

Farming Arrived In Stone Age Europe Via Near East Migrants
2013-02-12 12:25:25

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The seeds for the rise of Western civilization were planted when humans living in Europe began to adopt farming, a more efficient and reliable way to supply food, as opposed to hunting and gathering. A recent report published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), found farming technology was brought to the region by people who moved there from the Near East. "One of the big questions in European archaeology...

figurine
2012-08-30 14:52:40

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Two small figurines discovered near Jerusalem have been dated between 9,000 and 9,500 years ago and support the notion that religion and society played a significant role during the Stone Age. According to a press release by the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA), the ram and wild bovine statuettes were found while the authority was excavating near Tel Motza prior to work on the Jerusalem-Tel Aviv highway, a few miles north of...

Digging For The Oldest Genetic Material In Spain
2012-07-02 12:02:22

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Researchers from the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) have recovered and sequenced the oldest genetic material from two individuals living in Mesolithic Spain, over 7,000 years ago. This groundbreaking work of genetics, published in Current Biology, shows that the sequenced genomes are out-of-sync with modern day Iberians. "These hunters-gatherers shared nomadic habits and had a common origin,” said study co-author...

2012-01-26 09:00:17

A team of international archeologists, led by the Spanish National Research Council, has documented a series of more than 7,500-year-old fish seines and traps near Moscow. The equipment found, among the oldest in Europe, displays a great technical complexity. The survey will allow us to understand the role of fishing among the European settlements by early Holocene (10,000 years ago), especially in those areas where inhabitants did not practice agriculture until nearly the Iron Age....

2010-12-03 13:33:32

Agricultural "“ or Neolithic "“ economics replaced the Mesolithic social model of hunter-gathering in the Near East about 10,000 years ago. One of the most important socioeconomic changes in human history, this socioeconomic shift, known as the Neolithic transition, spread gradually across Europe until it slowed down when more northern latitudes were reached. Research published today, Friday, 3 December 2010, in New Journal of Physics (co-owned by the Institute of Physics and the...


Word of the Day
conjunto
  • A style of popular dance music originating along the border between Texas and Mexico, characterized by the use of accordion, drums, and 12-string bass guitar and traditionally based on polka, waltz, and bolero rhythms.
The word 'conjunto' comes through Spanish, from Latin coniūnctus, past participle of coniungere, to join together; see conjoin